DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Law Commission draws up options enabling leaseholders to extend or buy more cheaply </p><p>Millions of homeowners caught in the so-called “leasehold trap” may be able to buy their freeholds at a fraction of the price currently demanded by ground rent companies, under radical proposals from the Law Commission.</p><p>One proposal is for a simple formula where leaseholders will pay just 10 times their current ground rent to convert their property from leasehold to freehold. <br tabindex="-1"></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jul/19/radical-plans-to-end-huge-costs-of-buying-a-freehold-unveiled">Continue reading...</a>

Radical plans to end huge costs of buying a freehold unveiled

July 19, 2018 0:01

Law Commission draws up options enabling leaseholders to extend or buy more cheaply

Millions of homeowners caught in the so-called “leasehold trap” may be able to buy their freeholds at a fraction of the price currently demanded by ground rent companies, under radical proposals from the Law Commission.

One proposal is for a simple formula where leaseholders will pay just 10 times their current ground rent to convert their property from leasehold to freehold.

Continue reading...

<p>London dragging rate down while best performing regions are east Midlands and West Midlands</p><p>UK house prices are rising at the slowest annual rate for almost five years, according to official figures showing falling London property values dragging down the rate of growth across the country. </p><p>Revealing the latest snapshot for homeowners, the <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/inflationandpriceindices/bulletins/housepriceindex/may2018">Office for National Statistics</a> said annual house price growth fell to 3% in May from 3.5% a month earlier. The decline was driven by the fourth month in a row of falling house prices in the capital. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jul/18/uk-annual-house-prices-rising-at-slowest-rate-for-five-years-ons">Continue reading...</a>

UK annual house prices rising at slowest rate for five years – ONS

July 18, 2018 15:31

London dragging rate down while best performing regions are east Midlands and West Midlands

UK house prices are rising at the slowest annual rate for almost five years, according to official figures showing falling London property values dragging down the rate of growth across the country.

Revealing the latest snapshot for homeowners, the Office for National Statistics said annual house price growth fell to 3% in May from 3.5% a month earlier. The decline was driven by the fourth month in a row of falling house prices in the capital.

Continue reading...

Labour’s first ever Mayfair councillor is helping residents fight developers. He says local politicians can learn from his victory<p>The Monopoly board game has enshrined Mayfair as the most gilded neighbourhood in London: home to oligarchs, bankers and Tory MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, and host to swanky townhouses, glitzy hotels and luxury shops. It now also has, for the first time, a Labour councillor.</p><p> <span>Related: </span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/jan/26/ghost-towers-half-of-new-build-luxury-london-flats-fail-to-sell">Ghost towers: half of new-build luxury London flats fail to sell</a> </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jul/17/pancho-lewis-west-end-tory-mayfair-councillor-property-developers-corporate-london">Continue reading...</a>

Pancho Lewis: ‘We refused to accept that the West End had to be Tory’ | Patrick Butler

July 17, 2018 13:00

Labour’s first ever Mayfair councillor is helping residents fight developers. He says local politicians can learn from his victory

The Monopoly board game has enshrined Mayfair as the most gilded neighbourhood in London: home to oligarchs, bankers and Tory MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, and host to swanky townhouses, glitzy hotels and luxury shops. It now also has, for the first time, a Labour councillor.

Related: Ghost towers: half of new-build luxury London flats fail to sell

Continue reading...

<p>Number of homes put on market rises 8.6% but there has been no increase in buyers</p><p>A surge in homeowners putting their property on the market – just as buyers melt away in summer – is depressing house prices, according to the biggest property website, Rightmove.</p><p>The number of properties coming on to the market in July rose by 8.6% but there has been “no corresponding increase in buyer numbers to soak up the new seller influx”, Rightmove said. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jul/16/uk-house-price-slump-blamed-on-surge-in-sellers">Continue reading...</a>

UK house price slump blamed on surge in sellers

July 16, 2018 6:01

Number of homes put on market rises 8.6% but there has been no increase in buyers

A surge in homeowners putting their property on the market – just as buyers melt away in summer – is depressing house prices, according to the biggest property website, Rightmove.

The number of properties coming on to the market in July rose by 8.6% but there has been “no corresponding increase in buyer numbers to soak up the new seller influx”, Rightmove said.

Continue reading...

<p>I still owe £112,000 and I want to stay in my house, not sell up to pay it off</p><p> <strong>Q</strong> I’m 65 and single and still work part time earning £23,000 a year (£1,560 monthly) on top of my private pension of £550 and state pension of £700 (both monthly). My interest-only mortgage will come to an end in November 2019 and I will still owe £112,000. The house is worth £190,000 and I want to stay in it. What are my options? <strong>PH</strong></p><p><strong>A</strong> Until relatively recently, because of your age, if you didn’t have the money needed to pay off your interest-only mortgage at the end of its term, your choice would have been between selling up and downsizing or taking out an equity release plan to raise the cash needed to pay off the mortgage. Those options are still available to you, but as a result of the relaxation of the rules about the sale of interest-only mortgages by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), there has been a growing number of specialist “later life” lenders offering both interest-only and repayment mortgages to older borrowers excluded by mainstream lenders because of their age. So if your current lender won’t let you extend your mortgage, there is likely to be a specialist lender who will let you take out a conventional residential mortgage provided you meet its affordability requirements.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jul/16/im-65-and-my-interest-only-mortgage-is-ending-what-can-i-do">Continue reading...</a>

I'm 65 and my interest-only mortgage is ending – what can I do?

July 16, 2018 0:00

I still owe £112,000 and I want to stay in my house, not sell up to pay it off

Q I’m 65 and single and still work part time earning £23,000 a year (£1,560 monthly) on top of my private pension of £550 and state pension of £700 (both monthly). My interest-only mortgage will come to an end in November 2019 and I will still owe £112,000. The house is worth £190,000 and I want to stay in it. What are my options? PH

A Until relatively recently, because of your age, if you didn’t have the money needed to pay off your interest-only mortgage at the end of its term, your choice would have been between selling up and downsizing or taking out an equity release plan to raise the cash needed to pay off the mortgage. Those options are still available to you, but as a result of the relaxation of the rules about the sale of interest-only mortgages by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), there has been a growing number of specialist “later life” lenders offering both interest-only and repayment mortgages to older borrowers excluded by mainstream lenders because of their age. So if your current lender won’t let you extend your mortgage, there is likely to be a specialist lender who will let you take out a conventional residential mortgage provided you meet its affordability requirements.

Continue reading...

<p>The percentage of our wages spent on rent has fallen over the past decade. But which areas are the best value?</p><p>I think we can all agree where <em>not</em> to move. Analysis last month by property firm <a href="https://www.cbre.co.uk/research-and-reports" title="">CBRE</a> claimed London residential rents were the highest in the world. Another in April by property investors <a href="https://landbay.co.uk/" title="">Landbay</a> reported that renting Londoners spend (wow!) 89% of take-home income on rent; though <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44046392" title="">a survey by the BBC and Hometrack</a> found it to be more like 41% of income.</p><p>If you can’t avoid the capital, go east. Money Supermarket proposed Bexley and Barking &amp; Dagenham as the cheapest boroughs, with Havering just a notch up. One positive negative: high as they are, London rents are rising more slowly. Search the <a href="https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/housing-and-land/renting/london-rents-map" title="">London Rents Map</a> (london.gov.uk) for the latest.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/jul/14/where-to-move-for-affordable-rents">Continue reading...</a>

Where to move for… affordable rents

July 14, 2018 8:00

The percentage of our wages spent on rent has fallen over the past decade. But which areas are the best value?

I think we can all agree where not to move. Analysis last month by property firm CBRE claimed London residential rents were the highest in the world. Another in April by property investors Landbay reported that renting Londoners spend (wow!) 89% of take-home income on rent; though a survey by the BBC and Hometrack found it to be more like 41% of income.

If you can’t avoid the capital, go east. Money Supermarket proposed Bexley and Barking & Dagenham as the cheapest boroughs, with Havering just a notch up. One positive negative: high as they are, London rents are rising more slowly. Search the London Rents Map (london.gov.uk) for the latest.

Continue reading...

<p>There is a music scene. Vinyl shops have been spotted. Avocado toast is for sale. But Halifax remains Halifax</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/feb/18/halifax-burgeons-with-new-shoreditch-of-the-north-tagline">“The Shoreditch of the north”</a>, said BBC Radio 6 Music. “What?!” yelled Halifax – and the rest of the world. They groaned on the information desk at the smart new library when I brought it up. It is not. And the better for it. Sure, the anointed king of hipsters, Father John Misty, played Halifax. There is a music scene. Vinyl shops have been spotted. Avocado toast is for sale. There are ironic whiskers here and there, but many commute to Leeds, Hebden Bridge or Manchester, where property prices are less kind. No, Halifax remains Halifax, with its gutsy streetscape, excellent Borough Market (the hot pies!) and deadpan locals. It has just had a bit of cash spent on it for the first time in an age. The new library. <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk/the-northerner/2012/apr/02/halifax-lottery-square-chapel-arts-counci-england-york-wakefield">The Square Chapel arts centre</a>, with its natty roof. And the pièce de résistance, the restored Piece Hall, a vast Georgian cloth hall straight out of an imperial central European capital. Halifax, the Vienna of Yorkshire. That is more like it.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Very little, really, if you ignore the hype. More investment in the local economy would go down a treat, but the bone structure of the town remains excellent. Wet, of course, this being the Pennines. And (in my opinion) scandalously far from the seaside.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jul/13/lets-move-to-halifax-west-yorkshire">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Halifax, West Yorkshire: gutsy streetscape and deadpan locals

July 13, 2018 16:30

There is a music scene. Vinyl shops have been spotted. Avocado toast is for sale. But Halifax remains Halifax

What’s going for it? “The Shoreditch of the north”, said BBC Radio 6 Music. “What?!” yelled Halifax – and the rest of the world. They groaned on the information desk at the smart new library when I brought it up. It is not. And the better for it. Sure, the anointed king of hipsters, Father John Misty, played Halifax. There is a music scene. Vinyl shops have been spotted. Avocado toast is for sale. There are ironic whiskers here and there, but many commute to Leeds, Hebden Bridge or Manchester, where property prices are less kind. No, Halifax remains Halifax, with its gutsy streetscape, excellent Borough Market (the hot pies!) and deadpan locals. It has just had a bit of cash spent on it for the first time in an age. The new library. The Square Chapel arts centre, with its natty roof. And the pièce de résistance, the restored Piece Hall, a vast Georgian cloth hall straight out of an imperial central European capital. Halifax, the Vienna of Yorkshire. That is more like it.

The case against Very little, really, if you ignore the hype. More investment in the local economy would go down a treat, but the bone structure of the town remains excellent. Wet, of course, this being the Pennines. And (in my opinion) scandalously far from the seaside.

Continue reading...

<p>This pretty little market town is a magnet for eco-warriors, hippies and students. Lots and lots of students…</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>An odd spot for <a href="https://www.uwtsd.ac.uk/lampeter/">a university campus</a>, I’ve always thought. Lampeter, sitting contentedly amid the juicy green fields and lumpy hills of rural west Wales, is so small you might lose it under a cake crumb on the road map – just shy of 3,000 people, swelling by a third when the students descend. Students, one assumes, who are after a different kind of higher education experience, involving queueing for a pound of lamb chops at the (excellent) butcher’s, perhaps, or a warm buttered Welsh cake from the baker’s, rather than downing their body weight in Jägerbombsnowballs or whatever 19-year-olds drink these days. Not that Lampeter doesn’t offer nightlife of sorts, or that its students (and its permanent residents) don’t live high on the hog from time to time. I’ve witnessed the Friday-night aftermath. But this is essentially a Welsh market town in all its pretty, humdrum glory, albeit with a growing reputation as a magnet for eco-warriors and yarnbombing hippies. Albeit, too, with a higher chance than average of getting into a conversation about the computational modelling of optoelectronic medical devices at the tandoori.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Small, hard to get to and from, and inevitably provincial, in good and bad ways; once you’re here, you’re here. The university means it’s got more bustle and diversity in term time than your usual Welsh market town; it’s quiet, though, in the holidays. You might even miss the students.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jul/06/lets-move-to-lampeter-ceredigion-neat-town-if-like-students">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Lampeter, Ceredigion: a neat town, if you like students

July 6, 2018 16:30

This pretty little market town is a magnet for eco-warriors, hippies and students. Lots and lots of students…

What’s going for it? An odd spot for a university campus, I’ve always thought. Lampeter, sitting contentedly amid the juicy green fields and lumpy hills of rural west Wales, is so small you might lose it under a cake crumb on the road map – just shy of 3,000 people, swelling by a third when the students descend. Students, one assumes, who are after a different kind of higher education experience, involving queueing for a pound of lamb chops at the (excellent) butcher’s, perhaps, or a warm buttered Welsh cake from the baker’s, rather than downing their body weight in Jägerbombsnowballs or whatever 19-year-olds drink these days. Not that Lampeter doesn’t offer nightlife of sorts, or that its students (and its permanent residents) don’t live high on the hog from time to time. I’ve witnessed the Friday-night aftermath. But this is essentially a Welsh market town in all its pretty, humdrum glory, albeit with a growing reputation as a magnet for eco-warriors and yarnbombing hippies. Albeit, too, with a higher chance than average of getting into a conversation about the computational modelling of optoelectronic medical devices at the tandoori.

The case against Small, hard to get to and from, and inevitably provincial, in good and bad ways; once you’re here, you’re here. The university means it’s got more bustle and diversity in term time than your usual Welsh market town; it’s quiet, though, in the holidays. You might even miss the students.

Continue reading...

<p>It’s quiet and relatively affordable right now – but about to get very busy</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> This corner of south-east London has been “regenerated” once before. In the 1980s, red-braced developers magicked what was once <a href="http://www.exploringsouthwark.co.uk/surrey-commercial-docks/4587810154">Surrey Commercial Docks</a> into the quainter-sounding Surrey Quays, eradicating the embarrassing past of manual labour with a Thatcherite <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphaville_(film)">Alphaville</a> of suburban yellow-brick houses, cul-de-sacs and Frankie &amp; Benny’s. It was a banal vision of the future, compared with the area’s heroic past: mac ’n’ cheese or BBQ chicken pizza rather pales beside trading whales with Greenland, hauling forests from the Baltic, <a href="https://www.mayflowerpub.co.uk/history">giving the Pilgrim Fathers a send-off</a>, etc etc. So they’ve come up with a new plan. Worry not, nostalgists for the 80s: the Barratt homes and marinas are staying, as is <a href="http://mixmag.net/feature/printworks-was-the-saviour-london-clubbing-desperately-needed">Printworks</a>, which once churned out Daily Mails, but now churns out EDM for the clubbing masses. But lo: the developer behind <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/feb/09/gasholders-london-kings-cross-rebirth-google-hq">King’s Cross’s regeneration</a>, in one of the biggest planning applications, like, <em>ev</em><em>er</em>, has envisioned for the rest of Surrey Quays a £3bn future of skyscrapers and piazzas. I’m sure they’ll throw in a few creative hubs and artisan coffee roasters for good measure.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Can you survive years and years of building work? More to the point, are the future plans worth sticking around for? For the moment the area is pretty quiet, often underpowered and suburban, especially towards the river. Nice nature reserve, mind, and <a href="http://www.exploringsouthwark.co.uk/southwark-park/4590058392">Southwark Park</a> is delightful.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jun/29/lets-move-to-surrey-quays-london">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Surrey Quays, London

June 29, 2018 16:30

It’s quiet and relatively affordable right now – but about to get very busy

What’s going for it? This corner of south-east London has been “regenerated” once before. In the 1980s, red-braced developers magicked what was once Surrey Commercial Docks into the quainter-sounding Surrey Quays, eradicating the embarrassing past of manual labour with a Thatcherite Alphaville of suburban yellow-brick houses, cul-de-sacs and Frankie & Benny’s. It was a banal vision of the future, compared with the area’s heroic past: mac ’n’ cheese or BBQ chicken pizza rather pales beside trading whales with Greenland, hauling forests from the Baltic, giving the Pilgrim Fathers a send-off, etc etc. So they’ve come up with a new plan. Worry not, nostalgists for the 80s: the Barratt homes and marinas are staying, as is Printworks, which once churned out Daily Mails, but now churns out EDM for the clubbing masses. But lo: the developer behind King’s Cross’s regeneration, in one of the biggest planning applications, like, ever, has envisioned for the rest of Surrey Quays a £3bn future of skyscrapers and piazzas. I’m sure they’ll throw in a few creative hubs and artisan coffee roasters for good measure.

The case against Can you survive years and years of building work? More to the point, are the future plans worth sticking around for? For the moment the area is pretty quiet, often underpowered and suburban, especially towards the river. Nice nature reserve, mind, and Southwark Park is delightful.

Continue reading...

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