DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Landlords association tells government to persuade banks to end practice by lenders representing 90% of market</p><p>Urgent action is needed to tackle discrimination against benefit claimants by mortgage providers, according to the Residential Landlords Association (RLA), which has found lenders representing 90% of the buy-to-let market refuse a loan where a tenant is on housing benefit.</p><p>On Saturday, the Guardian revealed how NatWest told one landlord that she would either have to evict her tenant of two years, or take her mortgage business elsewhere, after a blanket ban by the bank on benefit claimants.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/oct/21/buy-to-let-90-percent-of-lenders-refuse-loans-to-benefit-claimants">Continue reading...</a>

Most buy-to-let lenders refuse loans when tenants are on benefits

Oct 21, 2018 19:06

Landlords association tells government to persuade banks to end practice by lenders representing 90% of market

Urgent action is needed to tackle discrimination against benefit claimants by mortgage providers, according to the Residential Landlords Association (RLA), which has found lenders representing 90% of the buy-to-let market refuse a loan where a tenant is on housing benefit.

On Saturday, the Guardian revealed how NatWest told one landlord that she would either have to evict her tenant of two years, or take her mortgage business elsewhere, after a blanket ban by the bank on benefit claimants.

Continue reading...

<p>Lord Porter says future tenants may be able to help design their future council homes</p><p>A single episode of the TV show Grand Designs may be enough to deter most people from ever trying to build their own home, but town hall bosses believe tens of thousands of homes in the next generation of council housing should be self-built.</p><p>Lord Porter, the chairman of the Local Government Association, told the Guardian he wants to “set forth a million builders” and give residents a role in the design and construction of as many as 100,000 new council-built homes.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/oct/21/self-built-houses-next-step-for-council-housing-says-lga-chief">Continue reading...</a>

'Self-built' houses next step for council housing, says LGA chief

Oct 21, 2018 15:19

Lord Porter says future tenants may be able to help design their future council homes

A single episode of the TV show Grand Designs may be enough to deter most people from ever trying to build their own home, but town hall bosses believe tens of thousands of homes in the next generation of council housing should be self-built.

Lord Porter, the chairman of the Local Government Association, told the Guardian he wants to “set forth a million builders” and give residents a role in the design and construction of as many as 100,000 new council-built homes.

Continue reading...

<p>The tenant is a vulnerable older woman who has always paid her rent on time</p><p>There are no arrears on Helena McAleer’s buy-to-let mortgage on a flat in Belfast. The tenant, a vulnerable older woman, has for more than two years always paid the £400-a-month rent on time. The money comes from housing benefit from the Northern Ireland Housing Executive. But when Helena approached her mortgage company, NatWest, for some additional borrowing, she was staggered to be told it would only be possible if she kicked out her tenant.</p><p>Why? Because NatWest, part of state-controlled RBS, won’t accept landlords having tenants on housing benefits. Given there are <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/housing-benefit-caseload-statistics" title="">4.2 million housing benefit claimants</a> in Britain, that’s a huge segment of the population. And how very odd that the state bank discriminates against people on state benefits.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/oct/20/natwest-is-it-right-to-evict-a-woman-on-housing-benefit">Continue reading...</a>

NatWest, is it right to evict a woman on housing benefit? | Patrick Collinson

Oct 20, 2018 8:56

The tenant is a vulnerable older woman who has always paid her rent on time

There are no arrears on Helena McAleer’s buy-to-let mortgage on a flat in Belfast. The tenant, a vulnerable older woman, has for more than two years always paid the £400-a-month rent on time. The money comes from housing benefit from the Northern Ireland Housing Executive. But when Helena approached her mortgage company, NatWest, for some additional borrowing, she was staggered to be told it would only be possible if she kicked out her tenant.

Why? Because NatWest, part of state-controlled RBS, won’t accept landlords having tenants on housing benefits. Given there are 4.2 million housing benefit claimants in Britain, that’s a huge segment of the population. And how very odd that the state bank discriminates against people on state benefits.

Continue reading...

<p>Make your own history in these fantastic houses, from Suffolk to the Highlands</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2018/oct/19/fairytale-homes-for-sale-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Fairytale homes for sale - in pictures

Oct 19, 2018 13:28

Make your own history in these fantastic houses, from Suffolk to the Highlands

Continue reading...

<p>Average UK prices rise 3.2% but sluggish London property market sees fall of 0.2%</p><p>UK house prices grew at the slowest rate in five years in August, in the latest figures to identify a growing divergence between a sluggish London property market and faster rates of growth other regions.</p><p>The average price of a UK home increased by 3.2% in the year to August, to £232,797, in the lowest annual rate of growth since August 2013, according to the figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and Land Registry.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/oct/17/uk-house-prices-rise-lowest-annual-rate-five-years-london-fall">Continue reading...</a>

UK house prices rise at their lowest annual rate in five years, ONS says

Oct 17, 2018 19:35

Average UK prices rise 3.2% but sluggish London property market sees fall of 0.2%

UK house prices grew at the slowest rate in five years in August, in the latest figures to identify a growing divergence between a sluggish London property market and faster rates of growth other regions.

The average price of a UK home increased by 3.2% in the year to August, to £232,797, in the lowest annual rate of growth since August 2013, according to the figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and Land Registry.

Continue reading...

<p>Uncertainty over Brexit puts off buyers in the capital and south-east during autumn</p><p>The housebuilder Crest Nicholson has warned that profits will be lower than expected because of slowing sales in London and the south-east, where <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/eu-referendum/all">Brexit</a> uncertainties are putting off buyers in the traditionally strong autumn selling season.</p><p>The company said it had not seen the pick-up in demand, with prospective buyers unable to afford a home in the most expensive areas and unwilling to make major spending decisions at a time of heightened political and economic uncertainty.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/oct/17/crest-nicholson-issues-profit-warning-as-houses-sales-in-london-slow-brexit">Continue reading...</a>

Crest Nicholson issues profit warning as house sales in London slow

Oct 17, 2018 10:18

Uncertainty over Brexit puts off buyers in the capital and south-east during autumn

The housebuilder Crest Nicholson has warned that profits will be lower than expected because of slowing sales in London and the south-east, where Brexit uncertainties are putting off buyers in the traditionally strong autumn selling season.

The company said it had not seen the pick-up in demand, with prospective buyers unable to afford a home in the most expensive areas and unwilling to make major spending decisions at a time of heightened political and economic uncertainty.

Continue reading...

<p>Some will say it’s turning into a foodie destination, but there’s enough unpretension to burst any inflated egos</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>Just back from the <a href="https://www.abergavennyfoodfestival.com/" title="">Abergavenny Food Festival</a>, where I fell in love with a tomato. As you do. It’s that kind of place. Food festivals are 10 a penny these days, but this one benefits from a distinct scarcity of anyone who once appeared on <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/masterchef" title="">Master</a><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/masterchef" title="">Chef</a>. It’s more like an overgrown village fete, full of people plying their prize marrows or my tomato woman, people who love things and just want to spread the love. I tell you, it was the tomato-ey-est tomato I’ve ever tasted north of Marseille. Abergavenny is a neat and tidy town, seemingly doing quite all right for itself, shopping streets quietly bustling with wool shops and opticians, its cottages and houses freshly whitewashed or grey with stone against a backdrop of green from the three hills that loom over the streets. Some will say Abergavenny is turning into a f***ie destination (I refuse to use the F-word) on account of the festival, and the local cultures of cheesemakers and mountain-lamb suppliers, bakers and yoghurt. Not quite. They are not yet selling yuzu at the Spar (you have to go to Waitrose), and the town has more than enough unpretension to burst any inflated egos.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Precious little. I’m thinking hard and scratching my head. Nope. Nothing.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/oct/12/lets-move-to-abergavenny-food-glorious-food">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Abergavenny: home of food, glorious food

Oct 12, 2018 16:30

Some will say it’s turning into a foodie destination, but there’s enough unpretension to burst any inflated egos

What’s going for it? Just back from the Abergavenny Food Festival, where I fell in love with a tomato. As you do. It’s that kind of place. Food festivals are 10 a penny these days, but this one benefits from a distinct scarcity of anyone who once appeared on MasterChef. It’s more like an overgrown village fete, full of people plying their prize marrows or my tomato woman, people who love things and just want to spread the love. I tell you, it was the tomato-ey-est tomato I’ve ever tasted north of Marseille. Abergavenny is a neat and tidy town, seemingly doing quite all right for itself, shopping streets quietly bustling with wool shops and opticians, its cottages and houses freshly whitewashed or grey with stone against a backdrop of green from the three hills that loom over the streets. Some will say Abergavenny is turning into a f***ie destination (I refuse to use the F-word) on account of the festival, and the local cultures of cheesemakers and mountain-lamb suppliers, bakers and yoghurt. Not quite. They are not yet selling yuzu at the Spar (you have to go to Waitrose), and the town has more than enough unpretension to burst any inflated egos.

The case against Precious little. I’m thinking hard and scratching my head. Nope. Nothing.

Continue reading...

<p>It’s as racy, posh, cultured and seedy as Brighton at its best</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> In his fierce part-memoir of Kentish oddballs,<a href="https://www.amazon.co.uk/All-Devils-Here-David-Seabrook/dp/186207559X" title=""> All The Devils Are Here</a>, David Seabrook describes <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Hawtrey_(actor,_born_1914)" title="">Charles Hawtrey</a> in his dissolute dotage – during the long years after Carry On – living on Middle Street in old-town Deal, but “banned from nearly every pub... Reeling round town like an old wasted weasel turfed out of Toad Hall.” Deal is that kind of place, as racy, posh, cultured and seedy as Brighton at its best, only stuck out on the fat belly of Kent as far as possible from anywhere but Calais, without the hordes. “A villainous place... full of filthy people,” said professional Grinch <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Cobbett" title="">William Cobbett</a>. What better recommendation? Recent years have brought the inevitable artists and gentrifiers, with their Scandi-chic, fussiness about coffee and disdain for Harvesters. Perhaps they see in Deal the charm of times passed, without all the rickets and miseries that Seabrook still spied down its alleyways. But Deal can absorb such newcomers. It’s seen it all before. It has history. Three Tudor castles, Royal Marine barracks, Julius Caesar, sailors, coalminers, IRA bombs, Charles Hawtrey. Oh, yes, these streets have tales to tell.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> I see nothing. It’s a touch out on its own, and the local jobs scene is limited. Not everyone will like its bawdiness, raffishness and occasional tawdriness.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/oct/05/lets-move-to-deal-kent-these-streets-have-tales-to-tell">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Deal, Kent: these streets have tales to tell

Oct 5, 2018 16:30

It’s as racy, posh, cultured and seedy as Brighton at its best

What’s going for it? In his fierce part-memoir of Kentish oddballs, All The Devils Are Here, David Seabrook describes Charles Hawtrey in his dissolute dotage – during the long years after Carry On – living on Middle Street in old-town Deal, but “banned from nearly every pub... Reeling round town like an old wasted weasel turfed out of Toad Hall.” Deal is that kind of place, as racy, posh, cultured and seedy as Brighton at its best, only stuck out on the fat belly of Kent as far as possible from anywhere but Calais, without the hordes. “A villainous place... full of filthy people,” said professional Grinch William Cobbett. What better recommendation? Recent years have brought the inevitable artists and gentrifiers, with their Scandi-chic, fussiness about coffee and disdain for Harvesters. Perhaps they see in Deal the charm of times passed, without all the rickets and miseries that Seabrook still spied down its alleyways. But Deal can absorb such newcomers. It’s seen it all before. It has history. Three Tudor castles, Royal Marine barracks, Julius Caesar, sailors, coalminers, IRA bombs, Charles Hawtrey. Oh, yes, these streets have tales to tell.

The case against I see nothing. It’s a touch out on its own, and the local jobs scene is limited. Not everyone will like its bawdiness, raffishness and occasional tawdriness.

Continue reading...

<p>An exotic destination for middle-aged elopers</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Grange-over-Sands is the kind of spot namechecked in Victoria Wood sketches, Alan Bennett scripts or classic Coronation Street as the epitome of posh, the exotic destination for middle-aged elopers, with its hedonistic cocktail of hushed hotels, vigorous (but not overly so) rambling and restaurants with starched napkins and potted shrimps on the menu. It’s still a most pleasant place, if a little forgotten about. Whether you find it charmingly nostalgic or deadly dull depends on your penchant for secondhand bookshops, purveyors of hearing aids, chocolate boutiques and benches for gawping out across the squelchy plains of Morecambe Bay. It’s my kind of place, though one fears for its future. Today’s midlife elopers are more likely to opt for Cartmel, next door: nostalgic in its own, hipper way, with its cute, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/explore/locations/231334251/cartmel-priory/" title="">Instagrammable priory</a>, boutique hotels, delicious food shops and A-list restaurants. Plus the prospect of a slice of the village’s infamous sticky toffee pudding. Better than (middle-aged) sex. So I’m told.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Tucked rather out of the way of the 21st century. That, of course, being the point. Quiet. Gentle pleasures.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/sep/28/lets-move-to-grange-over-sands-cartmel">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Grange-over-Sands and Cartmel: ‘Ooh, Alan Bennett’

Sep 28, 2018 16:30

An exotic destination for middle-aged elopers

What’s going for it? Grange-over-Sands is the kind of spot namechecked in Victoria Wood sketches, Alan Bennett scripts or classic Coronation Street as the epitome of posh, the exotic destination for middle-aged elopers, with its hedonistic cocktail of hushed hotels, vigorous (but not overly so) rambling and restaurants with starched napkins and potted shrimps on the menu. It’s still a most pleasant place, if a little forgotten about. Whether you find it charmingly nostalgic or deadly dull depends on your penchant for secondhand bookshops, purveyors of hearing aids, chocolate boutiques and benches for gawping out across the squelchy plains of Morecambe Bay. It’s my kind of place, though one fears for its future. Today’s midlife elopers are more likely to opt for Cartmel, next door: nostalgic in its own, hipper way, with its cute, Instagrammable priory, boutique hotels, delicious food shops and A-list restaurants. Plus the prospect of a slice of the village’s infamous sticky toffee pudding. Better than (middle-aged) sex. So I’m told.

The case against Tucked rather out of the way of the 21st century. That, of course, being the point. Quiet. Gentle pleasures.

Continue reading...

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