DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Luxury housebuilder reports annual profits of nearly £1bn but Brexit jitters remain</p><p>The London-focused housebuilder <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/berkeleygroupholdings">Berkeley Group</a> has announced record annual profits of nearly £1bn, but warned profitswere likely to fall in the coming year by about a third as Brexit uncertainty weighs on the capital’s housing market.</p><p>The company, which builds luxury homes in London and the south-east, said a 15% jump in pre-tax profits to £934.9m in the year to 30 April could prove to be the peak as the market remained subdued.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/jun/20/berkeley-peak-profits-london-housing-market-brexit">Continue reading...</a>

Berkeley hits peak profits as it warns of London housing slump

June 20, 2018 15:50

Luxury housebuilder reports annual profits of nearly £1bn but Brexit jitters remain

The London-focused housebuilder Berkeley Group has announced record annual profits of nearly £1bn, but warned profitswere likely to fall in the coming year by about a third as Brexit uncertainty weighs on the capital’s housing market.

The company, which builds luxury homes in London and the south-east, said a 15% jump in pre-tax profits to £934.9m in the year to 30 April could prove to be the peak as the market remained subdued.

Continue reading...

<p>For many of us, giving up on home ownership represents freedom – we’d rather the focus shifted to improving renting</p><p>The media has decided to constantly bombard millennials with poor-quality and largely unwanted advice on buying property. We should <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/may/16/avocados-own-house-baby-boomer-millennials-deposit-brunch" title="">eat fewer avocados</a>, some warn. We should stop going out or paying for Netflix. According to one article <a href="https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/millennials-are-hiring-cleaners-instead-of-saving-up-for-a-deposit-a3863341.html" title="">last week</a>, millennials are frivolously spending on cleaners rather than saving for a deposit.</p><p>Almost every bit of financial advice to millennials is framed in terms of a deposit – but for those living in London, this could be absolutely terrible advice. Quite a lot of millennials have given up on buying altogether, a decision that for many of us makes absolute sense.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jun/20/millennial-house-home-ownership-renting">Continue reading...</a>

Note to news outlets: not every millennial wants to buy a house | James Ball

June 20, 2018 9:00

For many of us, giving up on home ownership represents freedom – we’d rather the focus shifted to improving renting

The media has decided to constantly bombard millennials with poor-quality and largely unwanted advice on buying property. We should eat fewer avocados, some warn. We should stop going out or paying for Netflix. According to one article last week, millennials are frivolously spending on cleaners rather than saving for a deposit.

Almost every bit of financial advice to millennials is framed in terms of a deposit – but for those living in London, this could be absolutely terrible advice. Quite a lot of millennials have given up on buying altogether, a decision that for many of us makes absolute sense.

Continue reading...

<p>Nerisa Ahmed and husband threaten to sue government agency that helped them buy home</p><p>A family who have seen the value of their London flat slashed from £600,000 to just £90,000 because of Grenfell-style cladding could sue a government agency that helped them buy their home.</p><p>They are the second homeowners in the New Capital Quay development in Greenwich to have their flat valued at rock-bottom prices. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jun/18/grenfell-style-cladding-drops-flat-value-nerisa-ahmed">Continue reading...</a>

'Grenfell' cladding: couple could sue after £600,000 flat now worth £90,000

June 18, 2018 10:02

Nerisa Ahmed and husband threaten to sue government agency that helped them buy home

A family who have seen the value of their London flat slashed from £600,000 to just £90,000 because of Grenfell-style cladding could sue a government agency that helped them buy their home.

They are the second homeowners in the New Capital Quay development in Greenwich to have their flat valued at rock-bottom prices.

Continue reading...

<p>I’m buying a house at a discount from a family member but need funds to renovate it</p><p><strong>Q</strong> My partner and I are first-time buyers. We are looking to buy a house from a family member. The family member has had the house valued at £120,000 but has offered it to us for £70,000 to help us on to the property ladder.</p><p>The house is in need of a rewire, central heating and new windows, bathroom and kitchen.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jun/18/mortgage-value-property-discount-family-funds">Continue reading...</a>

Can I get a mortgage for more than the value of the property?

June 18, 2018 7:00

I’m buying a house at a discount from a family member but need funds to renovate it

Q My partner and I are first-time buyers. We are looking to buy a house from a family member. The family member has had the house valued at £120,000 but has offered it to us for £70,000 to help us on to the property ladder.

The house is in need of a rewire, central heating and new windows, bathroom and kitchen.

Continue reading...

<p>The sport has so exploded in Britain in recent decades that even last resorts now have dedicated communities</p><p>I once did a double-take to spot surfers on a river in Munich; hours from the sea, it is not somewhere overly familiar with rip curls. Conclusion? You could probably surf in Coventry, if you put your mind to it. As Alf Alderson puts it in his book <a href="http://alfalderson.co.uk/newspapers-mags/surfing/surf-uk/">Surf UK</a>, surfing has so exploded in Britain in the past few decades that even “last resorts” – Lincolnshire, by the way – have dedicated communities.</p><p>Yin to Lincolnshire’s yang is Cornwall, Britain’s surfing mecca. You need precise conditions for the best waves: a long run of ocean, a hefty prevailing wind, the right depth and angle of sea bed. Cornwall, foursquare into Britain’s south-westerlies, warmed all year by <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/11/critical-gulf-stream-current-weakest-for-1600-years-research-finds">the Gulf Stream</a>, has them all – and the crowds. Newquay is Britain’s self-styled “surf city”, Fistral Beach and Watergate Bay famed for consistency.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/jun/16/where-to-move-for-surfing-property">Continue reading...</a>

Where to move for... surfing

June 16, 2018 8:00

The sport has so exploded in Britain in recent decades that even last resorts now have dedicated communities

I once did a double-take to spot surfers on a river in Munich; hours from the sea, it is not somewhere overly familiar with rip curls. Conclusion? You could probably surf in Coventry, if you put your mind to it. As Alf Alderson puts it in his book Surf UK, surfing has so exploded in Britain in the past few decades that even “last resorts” – Lincolnshire, by the way – have dedicated communities.

Yin to Lincolnshire’s yang is Cornwall, Britain’s surfing mecca. You need precise conditions for the best waves: a long run of ocean, a hefty prevailing wind, the right depth and angle of sea bed. Cornwall, foursquare into Britain’s south-westerlies, warmed all year by the Gulf Stream, has them all – and the crowds. Newquay is Britain’s self-styled “surf city”, Fistral Beach and Watergate Bay famed for consistency.

Continue reading...

<p>Couple say holiday was ruined after site cancelled booking at the last minute</p><p>You have bought your plane tickets and sorted out your accommodation but then, just days before you are about to set off on holiday, Airbnb suddenly cancels your booking with no explanation, wrecking your plans.</p><p>This is what happened to Surrey couple Roger Ridey and Alice Woolley, who had to scrabble around to rearrange their holiday after Airbnb – the company, not the hosts of the property – pulled the plug on their week’s stay in San Francisco, 10 days before they were due to arrive.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jun/16/airbnb-booking-cancelled-last-minute-holiday-wrecked">Continue reading...</a>

Airbnb wrecks travellers’ holiday plans as battle with cities intensifies

June 16, 2018 7:00

Couple say holiday was ruined after site cancelled booking at the last minute

You have bought your plane tickets and sorted out your accommodation but then, just days before you are about to set off on holiday, Airbnb suddenly cancels your booking with no explanation, wrecking your plans.

This is what happened to Surrey couple Roger Ridey and Alice Woolley, who had to scrabble around to rearrange their holiday after Airbnb – the company, not the hosts of the property – pulled the plug on their week’s stay in San Francisco, 10 days before they were due to arrive.

Continue reading...

<p>You can – just about – find Ipswichness peeping out, in its burgeoning festival scene or the independent shops and 17th-century gables</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Imagine the scene. Early 70s. Handlebar moustaches. Santana on the radio. California comes to Suffolk. OK, it’s an insurance firm, not a Silicon Valley startup. But look at that office: straight outta San Fran. Almost mirror-glass walls. Cool. Rooftop cafe. Escalators. Acid colours. <em>What</em>? A built-in swimming pool?! The Willis building, built by <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/norman-foster">Norman Foster</a> in his late 30s, still looks as if the future hasn’t quite caught up with it. Ipswich’s future turned out more banal than bright.</p><p>At least it’s fairly prosperous. Small mercies. But the waterfront slick of office parks and Pizza Expresses is more David Brent than Steve Jobs. Look hard, though, and you can – just about – find Ipswichness peeping out, in its burgeoning festival scene, say, or the independent shops and 17th-century gables amid the Zizzis on St Nicholas Street. For a thousand years, this was a North Sea port up there with Hamburg and Antwerp. Who knows, one day it might be again.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jun/15/lets-move-to-ipswich-suffolk-david-brent-steve-jobs">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Ipswich, Suffolk: 'More David Brent than Steve Jobs'

June 15, 2018 16:30

You can – just about – find Ipswichness peeping out, in its burgeoning festival scene or the independent shops and 17th-century gables

What’s going for it? Imagine the scene. Early 70s. Handlebar moustaches. Santana on the radio. California comes to Suffolk. OK, it’s an insurance firm, not a Silicon Valley startup. But look at that office: straight outta San Fran. Almost mirror-glass walls. Cool. Rooftop cafe. Escalators. Acid colours. What? A built-in swimming pool?! The Willis building, built by Norman Foster in his late 30s, still looks as if the future hasn’t quite caught up with it. Ipswich’s future turned out more banal than bright.

At least it’s fairly prosperous. Small mercies. But the waterfront slick of office parks and Pizza Expresses is more David Brent than Steve Jobs. Look hard, though, and you can – just about – find Ipswichness peeping out, in its burgeoning festival scene, say, or the independent shops and 17th-century gables amid the Zizzis on St Nicholas Street. For a thousand years, this was a North Sea port up there with Hamburg and Antwerp. Who knows, one day it might be again.

Continue reading...

<p>It’s the north-east’s pumping creative heart</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Oh, yes, everyone’s talking about Ouseburn. What? Never heard of it? Darling, where <em>have </em>you been? If Newcastle had a Shoreditch, this would be it. Or rather, if London had an Ouseburn… Those not in the know might just drive over the Byker Bridge and barely glance at the mechanics’ sheds, warehouses, Victorian odds and sods, and is that a farm (it is) underneath them. This, I’ll have you know, is the pumping heart of the north-east’s creative economy, resuscitated from postindustrial dankness by the community-driven <a href="https://www.ouseburntrust.org.uk/">Ouseburn Trust</a>, those odds and sods inhabited by clusters and hubs, co-working startups and digital-craft-hybrid-artisan-coffee-roasters, that sort of thing. Good for them. The best thing about Ouseburn, though, is its weirdness, that deep, dark crevasse of a valley hiding all sorts of mysteries; the way you might see horses wandering past those mechanics’ sheds en route for the stables, the slightly surreal “village green”, as if collaged from Ambridge. But the <em>really</em> best thing? Having a pint in the sun at <a href="https://www.facebook.com/TheFreeTradeInn/">the Free Trade</a>, watching the boats on the Tyne drift by.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> It hasn’t all come together yet; the fragments need to be stitched to each other. Developers are all over it: let’s hope it doesn’t succumb.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jun/08/lets-move-to-ouseburn-newcastle-upon-tynes-shoreditch-creative">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Ouseburn: if Newcastle upon Tyne had a Shoreditch, this would be it

June 8, 2018 16:30

It’s the north-east’s pumping creative heart

What’s going for it? Oh, yes, everyone’s talking about Ouseburn. What? Never heard of it? Darling, where have you been? If Newcastle had a Shoreditch, this would be it. Or rather, if London had an Ouseburn… Those not in the know might just drive over the Byker Bridge and barely glance at the mechanics’ sheds, warehouses, Victorian odds and sods, and is that a farm (it is) underneath them. This, I’ll have you know, is the pumping heart of the north-east’s creative economy, resuscitated from postindustrial dankness by the community-driven Ouseburn Trust, those odds and sods inhabited by clusters and hubs, co-working startups and digital-craft-hybrid-artisan-coffee-roasters, that sort of thing. Good for them. The best thing about Ouseburn, though, is its weirdness, that deep, dark crevasse of a valley hiding all sorts of mysteries; the way you might see horses wandering past those mechanics’ sheds en route for the stables, the slightly surreal “village green”, as if collaged from Ambridge. But the really best thing? Having a pint in the sun at the Free Trade, watching the boats on the Tyne drift by.

The case against It hasn’t all come together yet; the fragments need to be stitched to each other. Developers are all over it: let’s hope it doesn’t succumb.

Continue reading...

<p>A nostalgic market-town jumble of bow-fronted antique shops and Georgian-style bollards</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> In <a href="https://www.guardianbookshop.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=The+Communist+Manifesto&amp;order=relevance&amp;dir=desc">The Communist Manifesto</a>, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels did not make allowances for Dorking (I’ve looked). Dorking is why revolution will never come to the home counties. Dorking is what many – most? – people want in life, and fair enough. The easy life, for some at least. Job that pays. Bit of a commute, mind. Nice pubs. Domino’s pizza. Fancy restaurant for fancy nights out. A nostalgic market-town jumble of bow-fronted antique shops and Georgian-style bollards. <a href="http://www.gilliangladrag.co.uk/">Gillian Gladrag’s rather amazing Fluff‑A-Torium</a> on West Street, satisfying Dorking’s yarnbombers. A terribly English countryside, conforming to all expectations; <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2012/may/12/box-hill-stepping-stones">Box Hill</a>, attracting orchid‑spotters and leathered bikers alike (occasionally in the same person; I’ve seen him), is just outside. A gigantic metal cockerel. Maybe not that. But Dorking has one, should you want it.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Beware the shoals of Lycra-clad, middle-aged men on two wheels who pass through most weekends: the Surrey Hills are prime cycling territory – lovely unless you’re stuck behind 46 of them on the twisty A25. It’s not cheap – they don’t call this the stockbroker belt for nothing – but slightly more affordable than elsewhere hereabouts.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jun/01/lets-move-to-dorking-surrey">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Dorking, Surrey: perfect if you’re looking for the easy life

June 1, 2018 16:30

A nostalgic market-town jumble of bow-fronted antique shops and Georgian-style bollards

What’s going for it? In The Communist Manifesto, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels did not make allowances for Dorking (I’ve looked). Dorking is why revolution will never come to the home counties. Dorking is what many – most? – people want in life, and fair enough. The easy life, for some at least. Job that pays. Bit of a commute, mind. Nice pubs. Domino’s pizza. Fancy restaurant for fancy nights out. A nostalgic market-town jumble of bow-fronted antique shops and Georgian-style bollards. Gillian Gladrag’s rather amazing Fluff‑A-Torium on West Street, satisfying Dorking’s yarnbombers. A terribly English countryside, conforming to all expectations; Box Hill, attracting orchid‑spotters and leathered bikers alike (occasionally in the same person; I’ve seen him), is just outside. A gigantic metal cockerel. Maybe not that. But Dorking has one, should you want it.

The case against Beware the shoals of Lycra-clad, middle-aged men on two wheels who pass through most weekends: the Surrey Hills are prime cycling territory – lovely unless you’re stuck behind 46 of them on the twisty A25. It’s not cheap – they don’t call this the stockbroker belt for nothing – but slightly more affordable than elsewhere hereabouts.

Continue reading...

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