DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>With staggering deprivation, and swathes of wealth in Victorian suburbs, it’s arriving fashionably late to the regeneration party</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Stockport? Yes. Stockport. Been <em>through</em> it countless times, gazing down from the viaduct in my Pendolino, at its odd, dramatic landscape, the deep Mersey valley, the Stockport Pyramid, <a href="http://www.merseyway.com/" title="">Merseyway shopping centre</a>, mill chimneys, all chucked together like a petulant child. Interesting. Must explore. And then, one day, I did. It’s a game of two halves. On the one hand, its deprivation can be staggering. On the other, swathes of wealth in Victorian suburbs such as Bramhall or Heaton Moor. Stockport’s misfortune was to bet its economy on hats and silk. Judging from the number of columns on the town hall and the size of those Victorian houses, some people made a lot of money. These days, the town is arriving fashionably late to the regeneration party. But it has plans: office parks, retail parks, creative quarters and futureproofing. Hubs, I’m sure, will feature. Its Victorian market is to become the next <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/oct/18/ofm-awards-2015-best-market-altrincham" title="">Altrincham Market</a>. Its rather pretty old town has been restored. Watch this space.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Do not underestimate the scale of revival necessary. I hope it doesn’t ape Manchester’s bling economy too closely. Much of the centre is a swirl of infrastructure: learn to love flyovers.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/apr/20/lets-move-stockport-greater-manchester">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Stockport, Greater Manchester: ‘It’s a game of two halves’

Apr 20, 2018 16:30

With staggering deprivation, and swathes of wealth in Victorian suburbs, it’s arriving fashionably late to the regeneration party

What’s going for it? Stockport? Yes. Stockport. Been through it countless times, gazing down from the viaduct in my Pendolino, at its odd, dramatic landscape, the deep Mersey valley, the Stockport Pyramid, Merseyway shopping centre, mill chimneys, all chucked together like a petulant child. Interesting. Must explore. And then, one day, I did. It’s a game of two halves. On the one hand, its deprivation can be staggering. On the other, swathes of wealth in Victorian suburbs such as Bramhall or Heaton Moor. Stockport’s misfortune was to bet its economy on hats and silk. Judging from the number of columns on the town hall and the size of those Victorian houses, some people made a lot of money. These days, the town is arriving fashionably late to the regeneration party. But it has plans: office parks, retail parks, creative quarters and futureproofing. Hubs, I’m sure, will feature. Its Victorian market is to become the next Altrincham Market. Its rather pretty old town has been restored. Watch this space.

The case against Do not underestimate the scale of revival necessary. I hope it doesn’t ape Manchester’s bling economy too closely. Much of the centre is a swirl of infrastructure: learn to love flyovers.

Continue reading...

<p>Bank rate rise could cost average homebuyer an extra £138 each month on £175,00 mortgage</p><p>Interest rate rises may be gradual but they will not be glacial, Michael Saunders, a member of the Bank of England’s rate-setting committee has said, hinting that <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/apr/20/michael-saunders-bank-monetary-policy-committee-uk-economy-interest-rates">homebuyers could see the base rate rise to 2% before long</a>. So what would happen to your mortgage (and savings) if and when rates are hiked?</p><p>The base rate is currently 0.5%, so a rise to 2% implies an extra 1.5 percentage points on your annual interest payments. While that sounds low, it is equal to an extra £138 a month if you are the average homebuyer with the typical mortgage in Britain of £175,000. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/apr/20/what-would-base-rate-rise-mean-average-homebuyer-mortgage-repayment">Continue reading...</a>

What would a base rate rise to 2% mean for your mortgage?

Apr 20, 2018 16:01

Bank rate rise could cost average homebuyer an extra £138 each month on £175,00 mortgage

Interest rate rises may be gradual but they will not be glacial, Michael Saunders, a member of the Bank of England’s rate-setting committee has said, hinting that homebuyers could see the base rate rise to 2% before long. So what would happen to your mortgage (and savings) if and when rates are hiked?

The base rate is currently 0.5%, so a rise to 2% implies an extra 1.5 percentage points on your annual interest payments. While that sounds low, it is equal to an extra £138 a month if you are the average homebuyer with the typical mortgage in Britain of £175,000.

Continue reading...

<p>These properties may be small, but they’re packed with character – and in one case, have their own model village</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2018/apr/20/the-best-tiny-homes-for-sale-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

The best tiny homes for sale – in pictures

Apr 20, 2018 7:00

These properties may be small, but they’re packed with character – and in one case, have their own model village

Continue reading...

<p>Battersea residents told upgrade, including combustible panel replacement, will not be met by Astor management firm</p><p>Residents of 80 flats whose freeholds are managed by a company owned by David Cameron’s half brother-in-law are each facing bills of up to £40,000 because the building is clad with flammable panels similar to those used on Grenfell Tower, in London.</p><p>Leaseholders of the <a href="https://www.buildington.co.uk/london-sw11/holman-road/sesame-apartments/id/3423">Sesame apartments</a> in Battersea, south London, fear they are trapped in unsellable homes and William Astor’s company claims it is not responsible for the costs. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/apr/19/leaseholders-of-flats-face-40000-bills-over-grenfell-type-cladding">Continue reading...</a>

Leaseholders of flats face £40,000 bills over Grenfell type cladding

Apr 19, 2018 18:53

Battersea residents told upgrade, including combustible panel replacement, will not be met by Astor management firm

Residents of 80 flats whose freeholds are managed by a company owned by David Cameron’s half brother-in-law are each facing bills of up to £40,000 because the building is clad with flammable panels similar to those used on Grenfell Tower, in London.

Leaseholders of the Sesame apartments in Battersea, south London, fear they are trapped in unsellable homes and William Astor’s company claims it is not responsible for the costs.

Continue reading...

<p>We plan to build genuinely affordable homes for the millions of people priced out of the system</p><p>The housing market is broken, and, after eight long years it is clear that current Conservative housing policy is failing to fix it. Ministers talk big about housebuilding targets to be reached some time in the next decade. But what new homes we build, and who they’re for, matter just as much as how many we build.</p><p>To make housing more affordable, we need to build more affordable homes, and to hardwire housing affordability through the system, from planning to funding to delivery. The public know this: eight in 10 people think ministers should be doing more to get affordable housing built.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/apr/19/britain-housing-market-broken-labour-council-houses">Continue reading...</a>

Britain’s housing market is broken. Here’s how Labour will fix it | John Healey

Apr 19, 2018 6:31

We plan to build genuinely affordable homes for the millions of people priced out of the system

The housing market is broken, and, after eight long years it is clear that current Conservative housing policy is failing to fix it. Ministers talk big about housebuilding targets to be reached some time in the next decade. But what new homes we build, and who they’re for, matter just as much as how many we build.

To make housing more affordable, we need to build more affordable homes, and to hardwire housing affordability through the system, from planning to funding to delivery. The public know this: eight in 10 people think ministers should be doing more to get affordable housing built.

Continue reading...

<p>Committee calls on government to give local councils power to punish ‘most egregious offences’</p><p>Rogue landlords should have their properties confiscated by local councils, according to a cross-party report from MPs into Britain’s private rented sector. Current financial penalties are “meaningless” in deterring the worst, criminal offenders among landlords, according to the housing, communities and local government committee.</p><p>The committee also called for greater protection for tenants from evictions, rent increases and harassment, noting that 800,000 private rented homes suffer from excess cold, mould or faulty wiring. However, it made no recommendations for rent controls.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/apr/19/rogue-landlords-should-have-properties-confiscated-mp-report">Continue reading...</a>

Rogue landlords should have properties confiscated – MPs report

Apr 19, 2018 0:01

Committee calls on government to give local councils power to punish ‘most egregious offences’

Rogue landlords should have their properties confiscated by local councils, according to a cross-party report from MPs into Britain’s private rented sector. Current financial penalties are “meaningless” in deterring the worst, criminal offenders among landlords, according to the housing, communities and local government committee.

The committee also called for greater protection for tenants from evictions, rent increases and harassment, noting that 800,000 private rented homes suffer from excess cold, mould or faulty wiring. However, it made no recommendations for rent controls.

Continue reading...

<p>Fragments of a less salubrious past hold on for dear life amid the swank</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Of all the remarkable transformations in supergentrified London, that of King’s Cross is the most astonishing. I can <em>just</em> remember what it was, dim memories of jigging at its warehouse clubs in the 90s. Before my time, there’s always <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jul/26/long-good-friday-mona-lisa-dvd-review-philip-french">Mona Lisa</a> (the film) and reruns of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2013/feb/14/the-sweeney-box-set">The Sweeney</a> to recreate the area’s prostitution and darkness, its dripping railway arches and encrusted tenements. Railway stations used to blight areas, their comings and goings attracting the kind of untrustworthy spivs who try to terrorise the older women in <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/oct/25/ladykillers-classic-dvd-review-philip-french">The Ladykillers</a>. Nowadays they’re “hubs”, their sleek bars and delis paused in by commuters off to Potters Bar, their luxury apartments paused in by tech millionaires off to Singapore. We all come and go these days. Fragments of a less salubrious past, though, remain, holding on for dear life amid the swank, like <a href="http://www.housmans.com/">Housman’s radical bookshop</a> and the glorious <a href="http://www.wildlondon.org.uk/reserves/camley-street-natural-park">Camley Street nature reserve</a>, offering alternative utopias had history here taken a different path.</p><p><strong>The case against </strong>The thundering traffic and choking pollution of Euston and Pentonville roads. When <a href="https://www.theverge.com/2017/6/1/15723642/google-london-office-pictures-headquarters-kings-cross">Google’s HQ</a> is finished, expect the neighbourhood’s transformation to be complete. Eyewateringly expensive, mostly.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/apr/13/move-to-kings-cross-london">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to King’s Cross, London: a most astonishing transformation

Apr 13, 2018 16:30

Fragments of a less salubrious past hold on for dear life amid the swank

What’s going for it? Of all the remarkable transformations in supergentrified London, that of King’s Cross is the most astonishing. I can just remember what it was, dim memories of jigging at its warehouse clubs in the 90s. Before my time, there’s always Mona Lisa (the film) and reruns of The Sweeney to recreate the area’s prostitution and darkness, its dripping railway arches and encrusted tenements. Railway stations used to blight areas, their comings and goings attracting the kind of untrustworthy spivs who try to terrorise the older women in The Ladykillers. Nowadays they’re “hubs”, their sleek bars and delis paused in by commuters off to Potters Bar, their luxury apartments paused in by tech millionaires off to Singapore. We all come and go these days. Fragments of a less salubrious past, though, remain, holding on for dear life amid the swank, like Housman’s radical bookshop and the glorious Camley Street nature reserve, offering alternative utopias had history here taken a different path.

The case against The thundering traffic and choking pollution of Euston and Pentonville roads. When Google’s HQ is finished, expect the neighbourhood’s transformation to be complete. Eyewateringly expensive, mostly.

Continue reading...

<p>It’s a monied, country casuals kind of place</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Centuries ago, Tenterden was a port, the estuarine tentacles of the sea creeping up the squelchy Rother valley with the tides from <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2016/dec/02/lets-move-rye-east-sussex-tom-dyckhoff">Rye</a> to Small Hythe. These days the town is beached in the gentle hills and high hedges of Kent’s High Weald – though you never know, climate change may in time resurrect its long-dead shipbuilding industry. For now, at least, there is not a whiff of ozone in the spring air. Instead, Tenterden is all budding hop trellises and grapevines: much of the <a href="https://www.visitkent.co.uk/tenterden-wine-trail/">UK’s booming wine industry</a> is nearby – climate change again. It’s a monied, country casuals kind of place, with a pretty townscape of verges, trees and a who’s who of architectural styles, mostly ignored by coach parties thanks to its relative isolation off the beaten track – high on retirees (see below) and prep schools, low on thrills. Though I have been known to utter a yelp when the steam trains on the <a href="http://www.kesr.org.uk/">Kent &amp; East Sussex Railway</a> brake too abruptly.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Rather conservative, culturally and politically, and expensive with it.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/apr/06/lets-move-tenterden-hop-trellises-grapevines">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Tenterden, Kent: ‘Home of the booming British wine industry'

Apr 6, 2018 16:29

It’s a monied, country casuals kind of place

What’s going for it? Centuries ago, Tenterden was a port, the estuarine tentacles of the sea creeping up the squelchy Rother valley with the tides from Rye to Small Hythe. These days the town is beached in the gentle hills and high hedges of Kent’s High Weald – though you never know, climate change may in time resurrect its long-dead shipbuilding industry. For now, at least, there is not a whiff of ozone in the spring air. Instead, Tenterden is all budding hop trellises and grapevines: much of the UK’s booming wine industry is nearby – climate change again. It’s a monied, country casuals kind of place, with a pretty townscape of verges, trees and a who’s who of architectural styles, mostly ignored by coach parties thanks to its relative isolation off the beaten track – high on retirees (see below) and prep schools, low on thrills. Though I have been known to utter a yelp when the steam trains on the Kent & East Sussex Railway brake too abruptly.

The case against Rather conservative, culturally and politically, and expensive with it.

Continue reading...

<p>Warrington is a spaghetti junction of infrastructure. You can get everywhere from it</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Warrington’s got connections. It may not have the cachet or the name of some of its neighbours – Chester, say, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2012/apr/20/lets-move-to-altrincham-hale">Altrincham</a>, or the so-called “golden triangle” between Knutsford, Wilmslow and Alderley Edge. Its grand civic buildings and occasional redbrick Georgian townhouses hint at a past more illustrious than the present, which is mostly a tough, unglamorous affair of Primarks and retail parks, megapubs and dual carriageways (though there’s glamour aplenty on the streets on an average Friday night). No, Warrington’s USP, ever since the Romans crossed the river Mersey here, is its geography. You can get everywhere from it. OK, Builth Wells may be a struggle, but, girdled with three motorways, crisscrossed by two major rail lines and with the Mersey, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/video/2013/jun/03/manchester-ship-canal-video">Manchester Ship Canal</a> and Bridgewater Canal for those taking it slower, Warrington is a spaghetti junction of infrastructure. Which is why logistics companies, such as Amazon, plonk their sheds here, and why the canny live here, with its great schools and excellent property, at a fraction of the price of their neighbours in posher climes.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Canal walks aside, it’s not a looker. You can winkle out the odd independent store or cultural hotspot, like <a href="https://www.dayoutwiththekids.co.uk/walton-hall-and-gardens">Walton Hall</a>, but they’re not the main attraction.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/mar/30/lets-move-to-warrington-cheshire-property">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Warrington, Cheshire: ‘It's where the canny live'

Mar 30, 2018 16:30

Warrington is a spaghetti junction of infrastructure. You can get everywhere from it

What’s going for it? Warrington’s got connections. It may not have the cachet or the name of some of its neighbours – Chester, say, Altrincham, or the so-called “golden triangle” between Knutsford, Wilmslow and Alderley Edge. Its grand civic buildings and occasional redbrick Georgian townhouses hint at a past more illustrious than the present, which is mostly a tough, unglamorous affair of Primarks and retail parks, megapubs and dual carriageways (though there’s glamour aplenty on the streets on an average Friday night). No, Warrington’s USP, ever since the Romans crossed the river Mersey here, is its geography. You can get everywhere from it. OK, Builth Wells may be a struggle, but, girdled with three motorways, crisscrossed by two major rail lines and with the Mersey, Manchester Ship Canal and Bridgewater Canal for those taking it slower, Warrington is a spaghetti junction of infrastructure. Which is why logistics companies, such as Amazon, plonk their sheds here, and why the canny live here, with its great schools and excellent property, at a fraction of the price of their neighbours in posher climes.

The case against Canal walks aside, it’s not a looker. You can winkle out the odd independent store or cultural hotspot, like Walton Hall, but they’re not the main attraction.

Continue reading...

Switch regions:  Ireland | United Kingdom | Australia
Copyright © 2016  DaftDrop | Designed & maintained by Certak Ltd