DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Neither of my parents have a will, so does ownership of the house automatically come to me?</p><p><strong>Q</strong> I own my home with my parents. It’s jointly owned between me, my mother and my father. Also living here are my husband and my son (who are not named as joint owners).</p><p>My parents haven’t got wills. What happens to my home if I’m still living here when they die? Does the property automatically come to me or does it go to probate?</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/feb/04/i-own-my-home-with-my-parents-what-happens-to-it-when-they-die">Continue reading...</a>

I own my home with my parents – what happens to it when they die?

Feb 4, 2019 7:00

Neither of my parents have a will, so does ownership of the house automatically come to me?

Q I own my home with my parents. It’s jointly owned between me, my mother and my father. Also living here are my husband and my son (who are not named as joint owners).

My parents haven’t got wills. What happens to my home if I’m still living here when they die? Does the property automatically come to me or does it go to probate?

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<p>We investigate shoddy building practices that mean higher-than-expected heating bills</p><p>Newly built homes are <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/774949/EPB_Cert_Statistics_Release_Qtr_4_2018_v2.pdf" title="">more energy efficient than ever</a>, the government said this week. But thousands of buyers are finding that their expensive new homes are cold and draughty with heating bills far higher than expected. The culprit? The finger of blame is pointing towards builders rushing to meet targets, lax standards and poor inspection, with badly installed dry lining at the heart of the issue.</p><p>Dry lining became popular in the UK in the 1980s, replacing traditional “wet” plastering with ready made plasterboard attached to walls and ceilings. It means plastering can be done in a couple of days rather than weeks.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/feb/02/new-build-homes-why-some-owners-are-left-feeling-the-cold">Continue reading...</a>

New-build homes: why some owners are left feeling the cold

Feb 2, 2019 8:30

We investigate shoddy building practices that mean higher-than-expected heating bills

Newly built homes are more energy efficient than ever, the government said this week. But thousands of buyers are finding that their expensive new homes are cold and draughty with heating bills far higher than expected. The culprit? The finger of blame is pointing towards builders rushing to meet targets, lax standards and poor inspection, with badly installed dry lining at the heart of the issue.

Dry lining became popular in the UK in the 1980s, replacing traditional “wet” plastering with ready made plasterboard attached to walls and ceilings. It means plastering can be done in a couple of days rather than weeks.

Continue reading...

<p>Older people benefit from a raft of tax reliefs, while Generation Rent has been dealt a bad hand</p><p>At the lovely Meyrick hotel in Galway, I had my first experience of a freebie solely because I had just tipped over 55 years old. The hotel pointed out I could now benefit from their “golden years” package, knocking quite a bit off the price. Meanwhile at my gym, I now qualify for a low-cost deal because I’m over 55. And in a few years’ time I get the big one: the <a href="https://tfl.gov.uk/fares/free-and-discounted-travel/60-plus-oyster-photocard" title="">T</a><a href="https://tfl.gov.uk/fares/free-and-discounted-travel/60-plus-oyster-photocard" title="">fL pass</a> giving free 24-hour travel over the city’s entire transport network.</p><p>I shall continue to benefit from sizeable tax relief on my pension contributions – worth far more to older people like me on higher salaries, as I obtain 40% tax relief, while young people on smaller salaries get just 20% relief. I also benefit from Isa tax relief as I can afford to save when young people can’t. Then there is the juiciest of all tax reliefs: no capital gains tax when I sell my home – while Generation Rent grimly hand half or more of their take-home pay to landlords.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/feb/02/oldies-are-pampered-we-should-offer-a-new-deal-to-the-young">Continue reading...</a>

Oldies are pampered. We should offer a new deal to the young | Patrick Collinson

Feb 2, 2019 7:00

Older people benefit from a raft of tax reliefs, while Generation Rent has been dealt a bad hand

At the lovely Meyrick hotel in Galway, I had my first experience of a freebie solely because I had just tipped over 55 years old. The hotel pointed out I could now benefit from their “golden years” package, knocking quite a bit off the price. Meanwhile at my gym, I now qualify for a low-cost deal because I’m over 55. And in a few years’ time I get the big one: the TfL pass giving free 24-hour travel over the city’s entire transport network.

I shall continue to benefit from sizeable tax relief on my pension contributions – worth far more to older people like me on higher salaries, as I obtain 40% tax relief, while young people on smaller salaries get just 20% relief. I also benefit from Isa tax relief as I can afford to save when young people can’t. Then there is the juiciest of all tax reliefs: no capital gains tax when I sell my home – while Generation Rent grimly hand half or more of their take-home pay to landlords.

Continue reading...

<p>This thriving crucible for contemporary Welshness offers fantastic views, sandy coves and relative isolation</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Ynys Môn likes to keep its distance, as well it might. People have long come to these shores to take things. The Romans slogged all the way from the Med, sniffing out Anglesey’s raw materials. Nowadays, second-homers come in search of its views, sandy coves and relative isolation. Thomas Telford’s beautiful <a href="https://menaibridges.co.uk/history/menai-suspension-bridge/" title="">Menai </a><a href="https://menaibridges.co.uk/history/menai-suspension-bridge/" title="">suspension </a><a href="https://menaibridges.co.uk/history/menai-suspension-bridge/" title="">bridge</a> may have long leapt over the tricky waters of the strait, and its neighbour, the <a href="https://menaibridges.co.uk/history/britannia-bridge/" title="">Britannia Bridge</a>, carries mainline trains chuffing off to the ferries at Holyhead; but the island still has a sense of a world apart. Its distance has kept even those savage incomers, grey squirrels, at bay. Ynys Môn has thriving colonies of red squirrels, and so many puffins it’s named an island after them. The greatest survivor, though? Welsh culture. Today, about 70% of islanders speak Welsh and make sure the island is a thriving crucible of contemporary Welshness. </p><p><strong>The case against</strong> If you are going to move here, <em>move</em> here; don’t pillage. Wylfa nuclear power plant was proposed for the north, but <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/jan/17/hitachi-set-to-scrap-16bn-nuclear-project-anglesey-wales" title="">has just been scrapped</a>. Following the closure of its aluminium smelting industry a decade ago, the local economy needs some good news.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/feb/01/lets-move-anglesey-ynys-mon-wales-world-apart-tom-dyckhoff">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Anglesey/Ynys Môn, Wales: ‘A world apart’

Feb 1, 2019 16:30

This thriving crucible for contemporary Welshness offers fantastic views, sandy coves and relative isolation

What’s going for it? Ynys Môn likes to keep its distance, as well it might. People have long come to these shores to take things. The Romans slogged all the way from the Med, sniffing out Anglesey’s raw materials. Nowadays, second-homers come in search of its views, sandy coves and relative isolation. Thomas Telford’s beautiful Menai suspension bridge may have long leapt over the tricky waters of the strait, and its neighbour, the Britannia Bridge, carries mainline trains chuffing off to the ferries at Holyhead; but the island still has a sense of a world apart. Its distance has kept even those savage incomers, grey squirrels, at bay. Ynys Môn has thriving colonies of red squirrels, and so many puffins it’s named an island after them. The greatest survivor, though? Welsh culture. Today, about 70% of islanders speak Welsh and make sure the island is a thriving crucible of contemporary Welshness.

The case against If you are going to move here, move here; don’t pillage. Wylfa nuclear power plant was proposed for the north, but has just been scrapped. Following the closure of its aluminium smelting industry a decade ago, the local economy needs some good news.

Continue reading...

Readers discuss the problems facing tenants in the private rental sector<p>It is odd that we would expect landlords such as Fergus Wilson (<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/jan/29/fergus-wilson-uk-landlord-evicting-kent-households" title="">Private renting: Tycoon evicts all tenants, including an entire street</a>, 30 January) to be anything more than capitalist rentiers. What duty of care does he have other than ensuring his houses are safe and sound, that he isn’t prejudiced when selecting tenants and that he abides by the law? And why shouldn’t he sell them? Surely that is the point of private housing – that the owners can sell up whenever they please.</p><p>The Tories fooled the public into believing the private sector could run better services and started the tragic sale of social housing, but we must never rely on private landlords to provide anything other than stopgap housing (although there will be many decent ones out there).</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/jan/31/tipping-the-balance-of-power-against-private-landlords">Continue reading...</a>

Tipping the balance of power against private landlords | Letters

Jan 31, 2019 18:31

Readers discuss the problems facing tenants in the private rental sector

It is odd that we would expect landlords such as Fergus Wilson (Private renting: Tycoon evicts all tenants, including an entire street, 30 January) to be anything more than capitalist rentiers. What duty of care does he have other than ensuring his houses are safe and sound, that he isn’t prejudiced when selecting tenants and that he abides by the law? And why shouldn’t he sell them? Surely that is the point of private housing – that the owners can sell up whenever they please.

The Tories fooled the public into believing the private sector could run better services and started the tragic sale of social housing, but we must never rely on private landlords to provide anything other than stopgap housing (although there will be many decent ones out there).

Continue reading...

<p>Rolling coverage of the latest economic and financial news, as Italy stumbles back into recession </p><ul><li><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2019/jan/31/uk-house-prices-brexit-eurozone-gdp-italy-business-live?page=with:block-5c52c886e4b01125b082a546#block-5c52c886e4b01125b082a546">Latest: Italy is in recession again</a></li><li><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2019/jan/31/uk-house-prices-brexit-eurozone-gdp-italy-business-live?page=with:block-5c53087be4b01125b082a8dc#block-5c53087be4b01125b082a8dc">PM: Germany is holding us back (!)</a></li><li><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2019/jan/31/uk-house-prices-brexit-eurozone-gdp-italy-business-live?page=with:block-5c53046de4b0e764aa151542#block-5c53046de4b0e764aa151542">Economists: This is a black mark on Rome</a></li><li>Italian economy shrank by 0.2% last quarter</li><li><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2019/jan/31/uk-house-prices-brexit-eurozone-gdp-italy-business-live?page=with:block-5c52c700e4b0e0e1bbc24258#block-5c52c700e4b0e0e1bbc24258">Eurozone only grew by 0.2%</a></li></ul><p class="block-time published-time"> <time datetime="2019-01-31T15:20:26.395Z">3.20pm <span class="timezone">GMT</span></time> </p><p><strong>And finally (I think), here’s our news story about Italy’s downturn:</strong></p><p> <span>Related: </span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jan/31/italy-slips-into-recession-for-third-time-in-a-decade-economy">Italy slips into recession for third time in a decade</a> </p><p class="block-time published-time"> <time datetime="2019-01-31T15:10:38.295Z">3.10pm <span class="timezone">GMT</span></time> </p><p>Three recessions in barely a decade, and not too much growth in between....</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2019/jan/31/uk-house-prices-brexit-eurozone-gdp-italy-business-live">Continue reading...</a>

Italy falls into recession as eurozone economy struggles - as it happened

Jan 31, 2019 15:20

Rolling coverage of the latest economic and financial news, as Italy stumbles back into recession

And finally (I think), here’s our news story about Italy’s downturn:

Related: Italy slips into recession for third time in a decade

Three recessions in barely a decade, and not too much growth in between....

Continue reading...

<p>With its glorious abbey and historic architecture this former Saxon capital could even be a little too perfect</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>Sherborne may be small, but what it lacks in girth it makes up for in history. This place is spilling over with stories. Back in 800 or so it was A Big Deal, a megalopolis of Saxon Wessex, with a cathedral and everything (in 1075 the cathedral was <a href="https://sherborneabbey.com/" title="">demoted to an abbey</a> – still there, still luscious). This was the front line in the unification of England, holding back the invading Danes from the east. Alfred the Great’s brothers are buried in the Abbey. And we haven’t even got to the second millennium yet. (Don’t get me going on Sir Walter Raleigh’s <em>two</em> castles. One is never enough, I find.) These days Sherborne’s a quieter affair, up at the top of Dorset, a little off the beaten track now that the A303 to the north saps the traffic from the A30. It’s quite content, though, a prosperous place where Fired Earth does a roaring trade. It has its past for company, materialised in its glorious, ochre architecture. When old age looks this good, who’s want youth?</p><p><strong>The case against…</strong> A little dull. A little perfect. One can have enough shops selling beige country casuals.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/jan/25/sherborne-dorset-packed-with-stories-of-its-ancient-past">Continue reading...</a>

Sherborne, Dorset: packed with stories of its ancient past

Jan 25, 2019 16:30

With its glorious abbey and historic architecture this former Saxon capital could even be a little too perfect

What’s going for it? Sherborne may be small, but what it lacks in girth it makes up for in history. This place is spilling over with stories. Back in 800 or so it was A Big Deal, a megalopolis of Saxon Wessex, with a cathedral and everything (in 1075 the cathedral was demoted to an abbey – still there, still luscious). This was the front line in the unification of England, holding back the invading Danes from the east. Alfred the Great’s brothers are buried in the Abbey. And we haven’t even got to the second millennium yet. (Don’t get me going on Sir Walter Raleigh’s two castles. One is never enough, I find.) These days Sherborne’s a quieter affair, up at the top of Dorset, a little off the beaten track now that the A303 to the north saps the traffic from the A30. It’s quite content, though, a prosperous place where Fired Earth does a roaring trade. It has its past for company, materialised in its glorious, ochre architecture. When old age looks this good, who’s want youth?

The case against… A little dull. A little perfect. One can have enough shops selling beige country casuals.

Continue reading...

<p>It’s ripe with history and character, from magnificent social housing to spooky churches</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> We shan’t mention <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk/hs2" title="">HS2</a> and the new Euston station (well, OK, just once more). But ’twas ever thus. Apart from a brief fancy period in the early 19th century when Charles Dickens and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/mary-wollstonecraft" title="">Mary Wollstonecraft</a> lived here, Somers Town has always been on its uppers, easy prey for <em>grands projets</em>. When London ended at Euston Road in the 18th century, it was famous for being where the city chucked its rubbish in mountainous landfills. By the mid-19th century, London’s most notorious slums were here. In the name of “improvement” and slum clearance, railway companies saw nothing wrong in charging through the neighbourhood with new lines, plonking their stations here, rather than posher Bloomsbury to the south. There’s no escape from the railways. That said, the commuters mostly dart down holes in the ground, leaving Somers Town, these days, one of London’s best-kept secrets, ripe with history and character, like the magnificent 1920s <a href="https://municipaldreams.wordpress.com/2013/02/05/the-ossulston-estate-st-pancras-the-english-karl-marx-hof/" title="">Ossulston Estate social housing</a>, Drummond Street’s Indian cafes, and the spooky <a href="http://posp.co.uk/st-pancras-old-church/" title="">St Pancras Old Church</a>, one of the oldest sites of worship in London, in whose churchyard the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Pancras_Old_Church#/media/File:2780theHardyTreeOldStPancrasChurchyard.jpg" title="">Hardy Tree</a> grows among gravestones moved by the young Thomas Hardy (when he was an architect) to make way for St Pancras station; railways even bothering the dead.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong><strong> </strong>The disruption of HS2 construction for years to come. Gruff around the edges. Euston Road is choked with traffic and pollution 24/7.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/jan/18/lets-move-to-somers-town-one-of-londons-best-kept-secrets">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Somers Town: one of London’s best-kept secrets

Jan 18, 2019 16:30

It’s ripe with history and character, from magnificent social housing to spooky churches

What’s going for it? We shan’t mention HS2 and the new Euston station (well, OK, just once more). But ’twas ever thus. Apart from a brief fancy period in the early 19th century when Charles Dickens and Mary Wollstonecraft lived here, Somers Town has always been on its uppers, easy prey for grands projets. When London ended at Euston Road in the 18th century, it was famous for being where the city chucked its rubbish in mountainous landfills. By the mid-19th century, London’s most notorious slums were here. In the name of “improvement” and slum clearance, railway companies saw nothing wrong in charging through the neighbourhood with new lines, plonking their stations here, rather than posher Bloomsbury to the south. There’s no escape from the railways. That said, the commuters mostly dart down holes in the ground, leaving Somers Town, these days, one of London’s best-kept secrets, ripe with history and character, like the magnificent 1920s Ossulston Estate social housing, Drummond Street’s Indian cafes, and the spooky St Pancras Old Church, one of the oldest sites of worship in London, in whose churchyard the Hardy Tree grows among gravestones moved by the young Thomas Hardy (when he was an architect) to make way for St Pancras station; railways even bothering the dead.

The case against The disruption of HS2 construction for years to come. Gruff around the edges. Euston Road is choked with traffic and pollution 24/7.

Continue reading...

<p>If it wasn’t in the remoter end of the Fens, it would be overrun with tourists</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Amazing, the effect of geography. Were King’s Lynn anywhere else in the country but squelched into the remoter end of the Fens, it would be overrun with tourists. They’d be there getting selfies next to some 18th-century townhouses or cutie-pie half-timbered cottages they’d seen in the latest Sunday night costume drama. Bistros and artisan coffee houses would be flush. Various branches of Edinburgh Woollen Mills would have opened. But it is not. It <em>is</em> squelched into the remoter end of the Fens. The wealth of the north Norfolk coast is tantalisingly near, but not quite near enough. That relative remoteness today (I mean, it’s only just over an hour to Cambridge, so it’s hardly Siberia, is it?) has bred an independent spirit: there’s some great local culture behind those pedimented porticoes, and a fair bit of money has been spent on sprucing up the place. Geography favoured King’s Lynn hundreds of years ago, before trade shifted to the Atlantic. That’s why it’s so beautiful today, all cobbles, alleys and warehouses. King’s Lynn was once the biggest port in the country, and its merchants flashed their cash on those 18th-century townhouses. Maybe fortune will smile on it again some day.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> The poor place has been scandalously knocked about in decades past, to make room for car parks and dual carriageways, meaning that today it’s a slightly surreal mishmash of 18th-century alleys and retail parks.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/jan/11/lets-move-to-kings-lynn-norfolk-it-is-beautiful">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to King’s Lynn, Norfolk: it’s beautiful – all cobbles, alleys and warehouses

Jan 11, 2019 16:29

If it wasn’t in the remoter end of the Fens, it would be overrun with tourists

What’s going for it? Amazing, the effect of geography. Were King’s Lynn anywhere else in the country but squelched into the remoter end of the Fens, it would be overrun with tourists. They’d be there getting selfies next to some 18th-century townhouses or cutie-pie half-timbered cottages they’d seen in the latest Sunday night costume drama. Bistros and artisan coffee houses would be flush. Various branches of Edinburgh Woollen Mills would have opened. But it is not. It is squelched into the remoter end of the Fens. The wealth of the north Norfolk coast is tantalisingly near, but not quite near enough. That relative remoteness today (I mean, it’s only just over an hour to Cambridge, so it’s hardly Siberia, is it?) has bred an independent spirit: there’s some great local culture behind those pedimented porticoes, and a fair bit of money has been spent on sprucing up the place. Geography favoured King’s Lynn hundreds of years ago, before trade shifted to the Atlantic. That’s why it’s so beautiful today, all cobbles, alleys and warehouses. King’s Lynn was once the biggest port in the country, and its merchants flashed their cash on those 18th-century townhouses. Maybe fortune will smile on it again some day.

The case against The poor place has been scandalously knocked about in decades past, to make room for car parks and dual carriageways, meaning that today it’s a slightly surreal mishmash of 18th-century alleys and retail parks.

Continue reading...

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