DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>The person who owns 60% of the freehold would be uncooperative as we had a dispute</p><p><strong>Q</strong> I live in a Victorian house that has been converted into five flats. I bought my flat several years ago and own 20% of the freehold. The lease on my flat is now less than 80 years, and understandably I want to extend the lease. The managing agent told all the leaseholders last year that he would take action to extend the leases but has done nothing about it and does not respond to my emails. He is not an easy person to do business with. There is also no point me contacting the other freeholders as the person who owns 60% of the freehold would be uncooperative, as I have successfully prevented him converting the garage attached to the house into a residential dwelling.</p><p>Is there anything I can do to extend the leasehold? (I am reluctant to employ a lawyer as their services are so expensive.) I understand that new legislation will shortly come before parliament which will make it easier for leaseholders to extend their leases. Should I simply wait for the legislation to be passed?<br><strong>GL</strong></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/may/27/i-want-to-extend-the-lease-on-my-flat-but-the-freeholders-wont-help">Continue reading...</a>

I want to extend the lease on my flat, but the freeholders won't help

May 27, 2019 7:00

The person who owns 60% of the freehold would be uncooperative as we had a dispute

Q I live in a Victorian house that has been converted into five flats. I bought my flat several years ago and own 20% of the freehold. The lease on my flat is now less than 80 years, and understandably I want to extend the lease. The managing agent told all the leaseholders last year that he would take action to extend the leases but has done nothing about it and does not respond to my emails. He is not an easy person to do business with. There is also no point me contacting the other freeholders as the person who owns 60% of the freehold would be uncooperative, as I have successfully prevented him converting the garage attached to the house into a residential dwelling.

Is there anything I can do to extend the leasehold? (I am reluctant to employ a lawyer as their services are so expensive.) I understand that new legislation will shortly come before parliament which will make it easier for leaseholders to extend their leases. Should I simply wait for the legislation to be passed?
GL

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Figures that appear to show Londoners are significantly better off than people in other parts of Britain don’t tell the whole story, says <strong>Maggie Kemmner</strong><p>The article (<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/may/22/londoners-have-8000-more-to-spend-or-save-than-uk-average" title="">Big regional gaps revealed in disposable incomes across UK</a>, 23 May) is very misleading. It makes no allowances for the increased housing costs most Londoners face.</p><p>In February 2019, Londoners spent the biggest proportion of their income on rent as compared to other areas of the UK; more than one third of a household’s income. The average monthly rental was £1,599 as compared to a £940 UK average. Over a year, this amounts to £7,908 extra housing costs: which pretty much wipes out the “extra money” that Londoners have to spend post-tax as compared to the UK average. This data is from <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/752203/average-cost-of-rent-by-region-uk/" title="">statistica.com</a>.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/may/26/why-londons-not-such-a-capital-place-to-live">Continue reading...</a>

Why London’s not such a capital place to live | Letter

May 26, 2019 17:42

Figures that appear to show Londoners are significantly better off than people in other parts of Britain don’t tell the whole story, says Maggie Kemmner

The article (Big regional gaps revealed in disposable incomes across UK, 23 May) is very misleading. It makes no allowances for the increased housing costs most Londoners face.

In February 2019, Londoners spent the biggest proportion of their income on rent as compared to other areas of the UK; more than one third of a household’s income. The average monthly rental was £1,599 as compared to a £940 UK average. Over a year, this amounts to £7,908 extra housing costs: which pretty much wipes out the “extra money” that Londoners have to spend post-tax as compared to the UK average. This data is from statistica.com.

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<p>Thousands of homeowners whose banks collapsed in the financial crisis have been unable to move to a cheaper deal<br></p><p>Thousands of mortgage customers of now-defunct banks who had their loans sold on after the financial crisis are hoping new moves by regulators and MPs will free them up to shop around for cheaper deals.</p><p>These borrowers, dubbed “mortgage prisoners”, include Jayne Emsley and her husband, who took out a Northern Rock mortgage in 2006 and are now with Landmark Mortgages, which is owned by US-based private equity firm Cerberus.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/may/25/hope-for-mortgage-prisoners-as-mps-and-regulator-act-to-free-them">Continue reading...</a>

Hope for 'mortgage prisoners’ as MPs and regulator act to free them

May 25, 2019 7:30

Thousands of homeowners whose banks collapsed in the financial crisis have been unable to move to a cheaper deal

Thousands of mortgage customers of now-defunct banks who had their loans sold on after the financial crisis are hoping new moves by regulators and MPs will free them up to shop around for cheaper deals.

These borrowers, dubbed “mortgage prisoners”, include Jayne Emsley and her husband, who took out a Northern Rock mortgage in 2006 and are now with Landmark Mortgages, which is owned by US-based private equity firm Cerberus.

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<p>Supermarket giant and consumer body say existing customers will not be affected for the time being<br></p><p>Two household names this week announced they are pulling out of mortgages, seemingly because the margins aren’t big enough.</p><p>On Tuesday, Tesco announced it had stopped new mortgage lending and was planning to sell its £3.7bn home loans portfolio. It currently has a little over 23,000 customers.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/may/25/tesco-and-which-to-stop-offering-mortgages">Continue reading...</a>

Tesco and Which? to stop offering mortgages

May 25, 2019 7:00

Supermarket giant and consumer body say existing customers will not be affected for the time being

Two household names this week announced they are pulling out of mortgages, seemingly because the margins aren’t big enough.

On Tuesday, Tesco announced it had stopped new mortgage lending and was planning to sell its £3.7bn home loans portfolio. It currently has a little over 23,000 customers.

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<p>Jennifer Offord’s new-build does not allow her to sign up to internet and TV from major providers</p><p>Water, gas, electricity and broadband are essential household utilities, but a large number of new homes are being built without the infrastructure for a decent broadband connection – or, in some cases, with no service at all.</p><p>Jennifer Offord, 36, bought her new-build flat in Hackney, east London, in February 2018, four months after it had been completed, only to find out she was not able to sign up to any of the standard providers. “I had assumed it would be fine as I had never had a problem before, but when I moved in and asked the developer why I couldn’t sign up to Sky, I was told Openreach hadn’t been set up and I was ruled out of getting any of the affordable TV and internet packages that I wanted,” she says.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/may/25/my-flat-was-built-in-2017-so-why-cant-i-get-bt-or-sky-broadband">Continue reading...</a>

‘My flat was built in 2017 so why can't I get BT or Sky broadband?’

May 25, 2019 7:00

Jennifer Offord’s new-build does not allow her to sign up to internet and TV from major providers

Water, gas, electricity and broadband are essential household utilities, but a large number of new homes are being built without the infrastructure for a decent broadband connection – or, in some cases, with no service at all.

Jennifer Offord, 36, bought her new-build flat in Hackney, east London, in February 2018, four months after it had been completed, only to find out she was not able to sign up to any of the standard providers. “I had assumed it would be fine as I had never had a problem before, but when I moved in and asked the developer why I couldn’t sign up to Sky, I was told Openreach hadn’t been set up and I was ruled out of getting any of the affordable TV and internet packages that I wanted,” she says.

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<p>Regulation chief says stricter rules could be imposed as price war threatens stability </p><p>The Bank of England has raised a red flag over the state of the mortgage market, warning lenders that stricter rules could be imposed if they take on too much risk.</p><p>The head of the Bank’s Prudential Regulation Authority, which is responsible for stability in the financial sector, said it was “entirely unsurprising” that <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/jan/20/brexit-gloom-property-mortgage-rates-cut">competition</a> across the mortgage market had forced lenders to take on riskier clients.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/may/24/bank-of-england-warns-risky-lending-mortgage-market">Continue reading...</a>

Bank of England warns over risky lending in mortgage market

May 24, 2019 16:31

Regulation chief says stricter rules could be imposed as price war threatens stability

The Bank of England has raised a red flag over the state of the mortgage market, warning lenders that stricter rules could be imposed if they take on too much risk.

The head of the Bank’s Prudential Regulation Authority, which is responsible for stability in the financial sector, said it was “entirely unsurprising” that competition across the mortgage market had forced lenders to take on riskier clients.

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<p>I am concerned about the consequences as I will be going against the terms of my buy-to-let deal <br></p><p> <strong>Q</strong> I have been approved for a buy-to-let mortgage. It has always been my intention not to live in the property. I live in London and am buying a property in my hometown further north. It now transpires that my brother would be happy to live in the property. I know family members are not allowed to be tenants as part of the terms and conditions of the mortgage. He will pay rent, but at a reduced rate. What are the consequences for me if we go ahead with this plan? <strong>AM</strong></p><p><strong>A</strong> If you breach the terms and conditions of your buy-to-let mortgage by letting the property to your brother (or any other close relative), your lender would be within its rights to demand full repayment of the loan. If you don’t tell your lender that a close family member is going to be your tenant, you would be committing mortgage fraud, which could also result in you being asked to repay the mortgage in full. Even if your lender did allow you to let to your brother, it might also take issue with him not paying a rent that covers 145% of the monthly mortgage payment, which would have been one of the requirement on which your mortgage application was approved.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/may/20/can-my-brother-be-my-tenant-even-if-my-mortgage-doesnt-allow-it">Continue reading...</a>

Can my brother be my tenant even if my mortgage doesn't allow it?

May 20, 2019 7:00

I am concerned about the consequences as I will be going against the terms of my buy-to-let deal

Q I have been approved for a buy-to-let mortgage. It has always been my intention not to live in the property. I live in London and am buying a property in my hometown further north. It now transpires that my brother would be happy to live in the property. I know family members are not allowed to be tenants as part of the terms and conditions of the mortgage. He will pay rent, but at a reduced rate. What are the consequences for me if we go ahead with this plan? AM

A If you breach the terms and conditions of your buy-to-let mortgage by letting the property to your brother (or any other close relative), your lender would be within its rights to demand full repayment of the loan. If you don’t tell your lender that a close family member is going to be your tenant, you would be committing mortgage fraud, which could also result in you being asked to repay the mortgage in full. Even if your lender did allow you to let to your brother, it might also take issue with him not paying a rent that covers 145% of the monthly mortgage payment, which would have been one of the requirement on which your mortgage application was approved.

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<p>We thought we would never buy, but just came into some money and are wondering about a mortgage</p><p><br><strong>Q</strong> We are at a complete loss. We never imagined that we would be in a position to buy property as we have struggled for years to save but recently we have come into some money which we could use as a deposit. However, both my husband and I are nearing 40 so are we too late? Where do we even start with trying to organise a mortgage? Surely it would need to be a shorter term one. I am fearful of taking out too much and finding ourselves stuck at age 58 or higher. Most people our age are working towards paying their mortgage off whereas we would just be beginning. Should we just stick the money in a savings account instead?</p><p><strong>A</strong> No, I wouldn’t just stick the money in a savings account. Buying a home of your own is clearly a long-term goal of yours even if you didn’t think it was an achievable one. And at nearly 40, you and your husband are spring chickens when it comes to being considered as older borrowers. Most mainstream mortgage lenders set the maximum age you can be at the end of the mortgage term at 70 or 75 so you could easily get a mortgage with a typical term of 25 years. At least 15 building societies – which, according to the Building Societies Association, ‘tend to be more flexible than high-street banks when it comes to maximum age limits’ – have scrapped upper age limits altogether. As a result borrowers can take out a 25-year mortgage regardless of their age at the time they apply for a mortgage.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/may/13/were-nearing-40-is-it-too-late-to-buy-our-first-property">Continue reading...</a>

We're nearing 40 – is it too late to buy our first property?

May 13, 2019 7:00

We thought we would never buy, but just came into some money and are wondering about a mortgage


Q We are at a complete loss. We never imagined that we would be in a position to buy property as we have struggled for years to save but recently we have come into some money which we could use as a deposit. However, both my husband and I are nearing 40 so are we too late? Where do we even start with trying to organise a mortgage? Surely it would need to be a shorter term one. I am fearful of taking out too much and finding ourselves stuck at age 58 or higher. Most people our age are working towards paying their mortgage off whereas we would just be beginning. Should we just stick the money in a savings account instead?

A No, I wouldn’t just stick the money in a savings account. Buying a home of your own is clearly a long-term goal of yours even if you didn’t think it was an achievable one. And at nearly 40, you and your husband are spring chickens when it comes to being considered as older borrowers. Most mainstream mortgage lenders set the maximum age you can be at the end of the mortgage term at 70 or 75 so you could easily get a mortgage with a typical term of 25 years. At least 15 building societies – which, according to the Building Societies Association, ‘tend to be more flexible than high-street banks when it comes to maximum age limits’ – have scrapped upper age limits altogether. As a result borrowers can take out a 25-year mortgage regardless of their age at the time they apply for a mortgage.

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<p>The estate agents did all the marketing but I sent them the local couple who wanted to buy</p><p><strong>Q</strong> A few months ago I agreed to have the photographs done and marketing literature for my home prepared by an estate agent in readiness for a move in late summer. I also signed a contract with them to market and sell my home. However, before it actually went up for sale a local couple who are neighbours asked if they could buy the house from us. I directed them to the estate agent who arranged a viewing and they made an offer which was accepted. The house never actually went on the market with the agents or was advertised by them. We are nearing exchange of contracts now and I was wondering if there would be any leeway to negotiate a reduction in the commission seeing as the agent did not actually find the buyer.<br><strong>PP</strong></p><p><strong>A</strong> You could give it a try but I don’t hold out much hope. Because the agent arranged the viewing and the buyers made their offer via the agent, the agent can argue that they did find the buyer. This would not have been the case if you had shown the buyers the property and had accepted their offer from them directly. That’s because if you signed a sole agency agreement with your agent – which is the most common type of estate agent contract - while you can’t instruct another agent to sell your home, you are free to sell it privately without involving the agent you are tied to during the term of the contract. And if you do find your own buyer and don’t involve the agent in the transaction, you are also let off paying the agent’s commission (although you may be asked to cover the costs of getting the photographs and marketing literature done).</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/may/06/i-sold-my-home-to-a-neighbour-do-i-have-to-pay-the-agents-fee">Continue reading...</a>

I sold my home to a neighbour – do I have to pay the agent's fee?

May 6, 2019 7:00

The estate agents did all the marketing but I sent them the local couple who wanted to buy

Q A few months ago I agreed to have the photographs done and marketing literature for my home prepared by an estate agent in readiness for a move in late summer. I also signed a contract with them to market and sell my home. However, before it actually went up for sale a local couple who are neighbours asked if they could buy the house from us. I directed them to the estate agent who arranged a viewing and they made an offer which was accepted. The house never actually went on the market with the agents or was advertised by them. We are nearing exchange of contracts now and I was wondering if there would be any leeway to negotiate a reduction in the commission seeing as the agent did not actually find the buyer.
PP

A You could give it a try but I don’t hold out much hope. Because the agent arranged the viewing and the buyers made their offer via the agent, the agent can argue that they did find the buyer. This would not have been the case if you had shown the buyers the property and had accepted their offer from them directly. That’s because if you signed a sole agency agreement with your agent – which is the most common type of estate agent contract - while you can’t instruct another agent to sell your home, you are free to sell it privately without involving the agent you are tied to during the term of the contract. And if you do find your own buyer and don’t involve the agent in the transaction, you are also let off paying the agent’s commission (although you may be asked to cover the costs of getting the photographs and marketing literature done).

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