DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>London has the greatest number of teams, of course. But where are the locals most soccer-mad?</p><p>A schoolfriend spent so much time at Arsenal games, his mum once yelled at him: “You should bloody well move into Highbury.” (She’d had a trying day.) Don’t tempt him, I thought to myself. Wealthier fans saw such fantasies come true in 2005 when flats in the old stadium went on sale. Every other football fan, alas, will have to settle for a little more distance between their sofas and the six-yard box.</p><p>For sheer number of teams: move to London. Boring! For sheer number per capita: the plot thickens. The Telegraph’s <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/11453267/Which-is-Englands-greatest-footballing-city.html">Jonathan Liew crunched numbers</a> in 2015 to find England’s “greatest football city” via clubs per&nbsp;population: Manchester, followed by Liverpool and then – interesting! – Blackburn.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/feb/24/where-to-move-football-teams">Continue reading...</a>

Where to move for… football teams

Feb 24, 2018 8:00

London has the greatest number of teams, of course. But where are the locals most soccer-mad?

A schoolfriend spent so much time at Arsenal games, his mum once yelled at him: “You should bloody well move into Highbury.” (She’d had a trying day.) Don’t tempt him, I thought to myself. Wealthier fans saw such fantasies come true in 2005 when flats in the old stadium went on sale. Every other football fan, alas, will have to settle for a little more distance between their sofas and the six-yard box.

For sheer number of teams: move to London. Boring! For sheer number per capita: the plot thickens. The Telegraph’s Jonathan Liew crunched numbers in 2015 to find England’s “greatest football city” via clubs per population: Manchester, followed by Liverpool and then – interesting! – Blackburn.

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<p>If the roots of its liberal and creative image are a mystery, its appeal is obvious</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Nobody knows why Hebden Bridge became “Hebden Bridge”, officially the quirkiest/kookiest/koolest/most LGBTQ-friendly/least chain-store-y etc small town in the universe. I have asked. I asked the people in the herb shop on the narrowboat, at the market, on the towpath, at the <a href="https://thetradesclub.com/">Trades Club</a>. I asked Urban Boffins in the university faculty I teach in. Nobody knows. It <em>looks</em> like other northern, post-industrial former mill towns: canal, steep valley, Methodist chapels, chimneys... It <em>feels</em>, though, utterly different, a little rain-soaked paradise. You’d never have guessed it from Hebden Bridge’s starring role in <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/tvandradioblog/2014/dec/23/best-tv-of-2014-no-1-happy-valley">Happy Valley</a>’s grimfest; nor from local boy Ted Hughes’ poem <a href="https://poetreecreations.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/stubbing-wharfe-by-ted-hughes-your-favourite-poem/">Stubbing Wharfe</a>: “the hopeless old stone trap”. Two decades after he wrote that in the 1950s, though, others saw what he couldn’t – artists, hippies and conservationists doing up its cheap, knackered buildings. Today the town feels festive even on a wet winter Tuesday: all co-ops, carrot cake and bunting – blunt Yorkshire wit, though, perfectly tempering the earnestness.</p><p><strong>The case against…</strong> Such is the demand to live here, and such is the shortage of space, you’ll pay a premium to move in. <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2015/dec/27/drone-footage-of-flooding-in-hebden-bridge-and-mytholmroyd-video">Floods</a>: though how well it bounced back from the last, in 2016. Cosmopolitan it may be, but it’s still a very small town. Occasionally tends towards over-kookiness.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/23/lets-move-to-hebden-bridge-west-yorks">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Hebden Bridge, West Yorks: a rain-soaked paradise

Feb 23, 2018 16:30

If the roots of its liberal and creative image are a mystery, its appeal is obvious

What’s going for it? Nobody knows why Hebden Bridge became “Hebden Bridge”, officially the quirkiest/kookiest/koolest/most LGBTQ-friendly/least chain-store-y etc small town in the universe. I have asked. I asked the people in the herb shop on the narrowboat, at the market, on the towpath, at the Trades Club. I asked Urban Boffins in the university faculty I teach in. Nobody knows. It looks like other northern, post-industrial former mill towns: canal, steep valley, Methodist chapels, chimneys... It feels, though, utterly different, a little rain-soaked paradise. You’d never have guessed it from Hebden Bridge’s starring role in Happy Valley’s grimfest; nor from local boy Ted Hughes’ poem Stubbing Wharfe: “the hopeless old stone trap”. Two decades after he wrote that in the 1950s, though, others saw what he couldn’t – artists, hippies and conservationists doing up its cheap, knackered buildings. Today the town feels festive even on a wet winter Tuesday: all co-ops, carrot cake and bunting – blunt Yorkshire wit, though, perfectly tempering the earnestness.

The case against… Such is the demand to live here, and such is the shortage of space, you’ll pay a premium to move in. Floods: though how well it bounced back from the last, in 2016. Cosmopolitan it may be, but it’s still a very small town. Occasionally tends towards over-kookiness.

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<p>Show your true colours with these visually stunning properties, from Devon to Norfolk</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2018/feb/23/brightly-painted-homes-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Brightly painted homes – in pictures

Feb 23, 2018 15:47

Show your true colours with these visually stunning properties, from Devon to Norfolk

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<p>Anonymous buyer picks up right to collect soaring ground rents on Blythe Court flats from freeholder MPs called ‘crook’</p><p>The freehold to a block of flats in Birmingham regarded as <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/22/freehold-on-disputed-birmingham-leasehold-flats-goes-on-sale">the worst example of leasehold abuse in the country</a> has been snapped up by an anonymous buyer for £180,000. </p><p>The deal leaves buyers of the small one-bedroom flats – who thought they would be paying just £250 a year in ground rent – locked into bills of up to £8,000 a year and ultimately spiralling to £8m a year over the life of the lease. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/22/freehold-worst-leasehold-abuse-block-sold-blyte-court-martin-paine">Continue reading...</a>

Freehold of 'worst leasehold abuse' block sold for £180,000

Feb 22, 2018 22:45

Anonymous buyer picks up right to collect soaring ground rents on Blythe Court flats from freeholder MPs called ‘crook’

The freehold to a block of flats in Birmingham regarded as the worst example of leasehold abuse in the country has been snapped up by an anonymous buyer for £180,000.

The deal leaves buyers of the small one-bedroom flats – who thought they would be paying just £250 a year in ground rent – locked into bills of up to £8,000 a year and ultimately spiralling to £8m a year over the life of the lease.

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<p>Ruling in favour of couple filmed on Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away may have repercussions for broadcasters</p><p>A family filmed being abruptly evicted from their home for Channel 5 series Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away has won a high court legal battle, which could force broadcasters to tone down the content of observational documentaries.</p><p>The episode of the show, which says it features “Britain’s favourite high court enforcement agents”, involved the filming of the eviction of a married couple for failing to pay rent.<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/feb/22/couple-filmed-evicted-channel-5-tv-show-win-damages-high-court">Continue reading...</a>

Couple filmed being evicted on Channel 5 TV show win damages

Feb 22, 2018 10:51

Ruling in favour of couple filmed on Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away may have repercussions for broadcasters

A family filmed being abruptly evicted from their home for Channel 5 series Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away has won a high court legal battle, which could force broadcasters to tone down the content of observational documentaries.

The episode of the show, which says it features “Britain’s favourite high court enforcement agents”, involved the filming of the eviction of a married couple for failing to pay rent.

Continue reading...

<p>£8,000 a year ground rent bill for buyers already and rising towards £8m – as watchdog warns time’s up for leasehold</p><p></p><p>The freehold to a 1960s block of flats near Birmingham regarded as the worst example of leasehold abuse in Britain will be auctioned on Thursday, as a new report warns that the leasehold system is on borrowed time. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/22/freehold-on-disputed-birmingham-leasehold-flats-goes-on-sale">Continue reading...</a>

Is this the worst leasehold block in Britain?

Feb 22, 2018 10:37

£8,000 a year ground rent bill for buyers already and rising towards £8m – as watchdog warns time’s up for leasehold

The freehold to a 1960s block of flats near Birmingham regarded as the worst example of leasehold abuse in Britain will be auctioned on Thursday, as a new report warns that the leasehold system is on borrowed time.

Continue reading...

<p>Imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmers</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> A confession: sometimes I pretend to read the Daily Telegraph. It’s a bit like cosplay. I try to imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmer,&nbsp;with a <a href="https://www.plainenglishdesign.co.uk/">Plain English</a> tongue-and-groove kitchen, polenta cake in the oven, pedigree labrador panting at the back door, several cases of vintage claret in the cellar. Perhaps like <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/profiles/4wGJsYGWMNnDn1NpG8DzjwY/jennifer-aldridge">Jennifer off The Archers</a>. Probably in Chipping Campden. It’s that kind of place: amazing, if you detach yourself from your entire world view. Gorgeous, rose-garnished 17th-century cottages lived in by Jemima Puddleducks, straight outta <a href="https://www.thisengland.co.uk/">This England</a>. Window frames freshly painted. No stained mattresses abandoned on the&nbsp;pavement. Framed photos of the Queen or St Jacob Rees-Mogg. Topiaried hedges. Quaint local customs (its Olimpick Games). Morris dancing (the horror). If there is a&nbsp;seamier side of closet <a href="https://www.redpepper.org.uk/about/">Red Pepper</a> subscribers, then my undercover research must have&nbsp;failed me.</p><p><strong>The case against…</strong> The rest of reality kept at bay. Morris dancing, etc. Tourists (though far fewer than Broadway and Moreton-in-Marsh).</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/16/lets-move-to-chipping-campden-gloucestershire-tom-dyckhoff">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire

Feb 16, 2018 16:30

Imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmers

What’s going for it? A confession: sometimes I pretend to read the Daily Telegraph. It’s a bit like cosplay. I try to imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmer, with a Plain English tongue-and-groove kitchen, polenta cake in the oven, pedigree labrador panting at the back door, several cases of vintage claret in the cellar. Perhaps like Jennifer off The Archers. Probably in Chipping Campden. It’s that kind of place: amazing, if you detach yourself from your entire world view. Gorgeous, rose-garnished 17th-century cottages lived in by Jemima Puddleducks, straight outta This England. Window frames freshly painted. No stained mattresses abandoned on the pavement. Framed photos of the Queen or St Jacob Rees-Mogg. Topiaried hedges. Quaint local customs (its Olimpick Games). Morris dancing (the horror). If there is a seamier side of closet Red Pepper subscribers, then my undercover research must have failed me.

The case against… The rest of reality kept at bay. Morris dancing, etc. Tourists (though far fewer than Broadway and Moreton-in-Marsh).

Continue reading...

<p>It will regenerate again before long</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>Deptford has been regenerated. It’s like what happens occasionally in <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/doctor-who">Doctor Who</a>, only with bollards and negroni bars. Like Doctor Who, regeneration comes accompanied with not a little controversy. And, like Doctor Who, this is very much not the first time. The neighbourhood seems to have been in permanent regeneration mode since Henry VIII stuck his dockyard here. Deptford’s latest shape appears to be Peckhamdalstonhackneyorsomewherelikethat. The old new Deptfords – halal butchers, mighty council estates, continental grocers, the brilliant <a href="http://www.thealbany.org.uk/">Albany theatre</a>, the beautiful 18th-century St Paul’s church, the splendid <a href="https://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/">Laban Centre</a> (ah, the Blair years!), two pie-and-mash shops, stained mattresses and greasy chicken shop wrappers piled on the pavement – they’re all still there, only they’ve been joined by “creative spaces” and craft gin bars. The library is called a “lounge”, dressed in gold lamé, decking and lattes, with a ball court on the roof, so you can throw a few hoops with your Proust. Love it, hate it? Worry not. It’ll regenerate again before long.</p><p><strong>The case against… </strong>Not for the faint-hearted: it’s a vigorous, noisy, traffic-clogged spot, with little green space and relief, bar a soothing walk along the sludgy Deptford Creek. Even more regeneration, in the shape of the vast <a href="http://www.convoys-wharf.com/">Convoys Wharf development</a>, awaits.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/09/lets-move-to-deptford-south-east-london-property-tom-dyckhoff">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Deptford, south-east London: love it, hate it? Worry not

Feb 9, 2018 16:29

It will regenerate again before long

What’s going for it? Deptford has been regenerated. It’s like what happens occasionally in Doctor Who, only with bollards and negroni bars. Like Doctor Who, regeneration comes accompanied with not a little controversy. And, like Doctor Who, this is very much not the first time. The neighbourhood seems to have been in permanent regeneration mode since Henry VIII stuck his dockyard here. Deptford’s latest shape appears to be Peckhamdalstonhackneyorsomewherelikethat. The old new Deptfords – halal butchers, mighty council estates, continental grocers, the brilliant Albany theatre, the beautiful 18th-century St Paul’s church, the splendid Laban Centre (ah, the Blair years!), two pie-and-mash shops, stained mattresses and greasy chicken shop wrappers piled on the pavement – they’re all still there, only they’ve been joined by “creative spaces” and craft gin bars. The library is called a “lounge”, dressed in gold lamé, decking and lattes, with a ball court on the roof, so you can throw a few hoops with your Proust. Love it, hate it? Worry not. It’ll regenerate again before long.

The case against… Not for the faint-hearted: it’s a vigorous, noisy, traffic-clogged spot, with little green space and relief, bar a soothing walk along the sludgy Deptford Creek. Even more regeneration, in the shape of the vast Convoys Wharf development, awaits.

Continue reading...

<p>Yes, the green welly brigade is in evidence, but this market town is one of those rare spots in the countryside where Guardian readers can be out and proud</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> It’s not often one yearns to set eyes upon a concrete multistorey car park. But Stroud is a welcome corrective to most Cotswolds towns, which are a succession of cutie pies, all Country Casuals, antiques shops and unmuddied green wellies, like scoffing three boxes of Thorntons with <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2011/may/14/the-waltons-ian-sansom-dynasties">The Waltons</a> on loop.</p><p>First of all, multistoreys. The town has its pretty moments, but much of it is ordinary (good ordinary), occasionally shabby (good shabby). Second, although the green welly brigade is in evidence, it is outnumbered. There is a Peacocks. There is the great <a href="https://twitter.com/stroudbookshop">Stroud bookshop</a>. There is <a href="http://www.fattoni.co.uk/stroud/">Fat Toni’s pizzeria</a> (slogan: “history in the baking”). It has health-food shops. It has community farms. It has “Britain’s first totally organic cafe”. It has a spirited community that likes nothing more than seeing off Tesco, McDonald’s and the BNP while rooting for trees, hospitals and post offices. That is right: Stroud is one of those rare spots in the countryside – such as <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2009/may/09/lewes-sussex-properties">Lewes</a> or <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2012/sep/28/lets-move-to-totnes-devon">Totnes</a> – where Guardian readers can be out and proud.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/02/lets-move-to-stroud-gloucestershire-cotswolds">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Stroud, Gloucestershire: a spirited community in the Cotswolds

Feb 2, 2018 16:30

Yes, the green welly brigade is in evidence, but this market town is one of those rare spots in the countryside where Guardian readers can be out and proud

What’s going for it? It’s not often one yearns to set eyes upon a concrete multistorey car park. But Stroud is a welcome corrective to most Cotswolds towns, which are a succession of cutie pies, all Country Casuals, antiques shops and unmuddied green wellies, like scoffing three boxes of Thorntons with The Waltons on loop.

First of all, multistoreys. The town has its pretty moments, but much of it is ordinary (good ordinary), occasionally shabby (good shabby). Second, although the green welly brigade is in evidence, it is outnumbered. There is a Peacocks. There is the great Stroud bookshop. There is Fat Toni’s pizzeria (slogan: “history in the baking”). It has health-food shops. It has community farms. It has “Britain’s first totally organic cafe”. It has a spirited community that likes nothing more than seeing off Tesco, McDonald’s and the BNP while rooting for trees, hospitals and post offices. That is right: Stroud is one of those rare spots in the countryside – such as Lewes or Totnes – where Guardian readers can be out and proud.

Continue reading...

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