DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

Readers respond to the latest news on the housing crisis, including right to buy for housing association tenants and the bedroom tax’s impact on single people<p>The Chartered Institute of Housing’s concerns that housing associations will replace sold-off social housing with new builds available on forms of tenure that are more lucrative for them and more expensive for potential residents (<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/aug/16/housing-association-tenants-in-midlands-to-be-given-right-to-buy" title="">Report</a>, 17 August) is borne out by developments that are already happening.</p><p>Family Mosaic redeveloped the Queen Elizabeth Children’s Hospital in Hackney Road, London. 116 of the flats were for private sale, 24 for shared ownership and only 48 for what is called “affordable” rent. This trend away from the original purpose of philanthropic housing associations to conventional residential property development is seen across the whole sector, and has been accelerated by the reduction in rents paid by social housing tenants enforced by the Welfare Reform Act.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/aug/20/extending-the-crisis-to-housing-associations-is-not-the-answer">Continue reading...</a>

Extending the housing crisis to associations is not the answer | Letters

Aug 20, 2018 17:36

Readers respond to the latest news on the housing crisis, including right to buy for housing association tenants and the bedroom tax’s impact on single people

The Chartered Institute of Housing’s concerns that housing associations will replace sold-off social housing with new builds available on forms of tenure that are more lucrative for them and more expensive for potential residents (Report, 17 August) is borne out by developments that are already happening.

Family Mosaic redeveloped the Queen Elizabeth Children’s Hospital in Hackney Road, London. 116 of the flats were for private sale, 24 for shared ownership and only 48 for what is called “affordable” rent. This trend away from the original purpose of philanthropic housing associations to conventional residential property development is seen across the whole sector, and has been accelerated by the reduction in rents paid by social housing tenants enforced by the Welfare Reform Act.

Continue reading...

<p>We haven’t exchanged contracts yet, but the agent wants more than £1,200 in commission </p><p><strong>Q</strong> I have a three-bedroom semi which I own outright. My partner and I wanted to sell up and buy a bungalow because of my health and problems with stairs. We went with our local estate agent and luckily a buyer was found in the first week it went on the market which was in May 2017. We have had lots of problems trying to find a suitable bungalow. The properties that we showed an interest in turned out to have major problems such as drainage at the first bungalow, lack of building regulations at the second and possible foundation movement in the third. We discovered all this over the past 15 months and in that time we have had chains break below us. We are so tired and although we desperately wanted a bungalow we have decided to back out of selling our semi. At this instant we had a solid buyer but we couldn’t face any more stress of looking for another bungalow. The estate agents have billed us £420 for advertising and photos, £420 as well as a commission fee of £1,235 which is half of the commission we would have paid, because they say they had actually sold our house even although we had not exchanged contracts. Is this correct practice?<br tabindex="-1"><strong tabindex="-1">SA</strong></p><p><strong>A</strong> If you withdraw from a sale, it is normal to be charged to cover the costs – such as advertising – that an agent has already incurred. And it is also normal to have to pay some or all of the estate agent’s commission but only if the contract you signed contained a “ready, willing and able purchaser” clause. What this means is that you still have to pay the agent for finding a buyer even if your situation changes and you have to withdraw from the sale. If your contract didn’t have such a clause, you shouldn’t have to pay anything on top of the £420 fee for photos and advertising. Another clause to avoid in estate agency contracts is “sole selling rights” which means that the agent is the only agent with the right to sell your home during the term of the contract but also that they will earn their commission even if you find a buyer yourself. This is not the case if your agent has sole agency which gives your agent the sole right to sell your home but does not make you pay commission if you find your own buyer.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/aug/20/estate-agents-fees-pull-out-house-sale-contracts-commission">Continue reading...</a>

Do I need to pay the estate agent's fees if I pull out of a sale?

Aug 20, 2018 8:25

We haven’t exchanged contracts yet, but the agent wants more than £1,200 in commission

Q I have a three-bedroom semi which I own outright. My partner and I wanted to sell up and buy a bungalow because of my health and problems with stairs. We went with our local estate agent and luckily a buyer was found in the first week it went on the market which was in May 2017. We have had lots of problems trying to find a suitable bungalow. The properties that we showed an interest in turned out to have major problems such as drainage at the first bungalow, lack of building regulations at the second and possible foundation movement in the third. We discovered all this over the past 15 months and in that time we have had chains break below us. We are so tired and although we desperately wanted a bungalow we have decided to back out of selling our semi. At this instant we had a solid buyer but we couldn’t face any more stress of looking for another bungalow. The estate agents have billed us £420 for advertising and photos, £420 as well as a commission fee of £1,235 which is half of the commission we would have paid, because they say they had actually sold our house even although we had not exchanged contracts. Is this correct practice?
SA

A If you withdraw from a sale, it is normal to be charged to cover the costs – such as advertising – that an agent has already incurred. And it is also normal to have to pay some or all of the estate agent’s commission but only if the contract you signed contained a “ready, willing and able purchaser” clause. What this means is that you still have to pay the agent for finding a buyer even if your situation changes and you have to withdraw from the sale. If your contract didn’t have such a clause, you shouldn’t have to pay anything on top of the £420 fee for photos and advertising. Another clause to avoid in estate agency contracts is “sole selling rights” which means that the agent is the only agent with the right to sell your home during the term of the contract but also that they will earn their commission even if you find a buyer yourself. This is not the case if your agent has sole agency which gives your agent the sole right to sell your home but does not make you pay commission if you find your own buyer.

Continue reading...

Amid warnings of dire consequences, here’s how to cope if it does become a reality<p>The currency markets have been doing little to allow British holidaymakers to enjoy a relaxing summer. The pound recently slumped to its lowest level against the dollar and the euro so far this year, meaning a break away just got more expensive.</p><p>Behind that slump was the growing possibility that talks between London and Brussels will break down over the coming months and the UK risks leaving the EU with no deal in place. Bank of England governor Mark Carney has warned that the prospects of this happening are “uncomfortably high” and should be avoided at all costs. But if that no-deal does, indeed, become a reality, what will be the impact on the rest of our personal finances?</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/aug/20/no-deal-brexit-personal-finance-what-does-it-mean">Continue reading...</a>

What’s the deal for your personal finances if there’s a no-deal Brexit?

Aug 20, 2018 6:59

Amid warnings of dire consequences, here’s how to cope if it does become a reality

The currency markets have been doing little to allow British holidaymakers to enjoy a relaxing summer. The pound recently slumped to its lowest level against the dollar and the euro so far this year, meaning a break away just got more expensive.

Behind that slump was the growing possibility that talks between London and Brussels will break down over the coming months and the UK risks leaving the EU with no deal in place. Bank of England governor Mark Carney has warned that the prospects of this happening are “uncomfortably high” and should be avoided at all costs. But if that no-deal does, indeed, become a reality, what will be the impact on the rest of our personal finances?

Continue reading...

<p>The help-to-buy boom in the property market has done wonders for Persimmon. How much longer can that last?</p><p>It’s late August, so things are quiet when it comes to company news. But on Tuesday there are first-half results from housebuilder Persimmon Homes, which is run by the best-paid boss of a public company.</p><p>Last week’s <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/aug/15/uk-top-bosses-pay-rise-average-earnings-hit-39m-2017-high-pay-centre" title="">report by the High Pay Centre</a> showed Jeff Fairburn was paid £47.1m last year – more than 10 times the £3.9m median figure for a FTSE 100 boss. The average employee at Persimmon would have to work 1,130 years to earn Fairburn’s annual pay.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/aug/19/homebuilders-house-of-cards-wobble-persimmon-help-to-buy">Continue reading...</a>

Is the homebuilders’ house of cards starting to wobble? | Sean Farrell

Aug 19, 2018 7:00

The help-to-buy boom in the property market has done wonders for Persimmon. How much longer can that last?

It’s late August, so things are quiet when it comes to company news. But on Tuesday there are first-half results from housebuilder Persimmon Homes, which is run by the best-paid boss of a public company.

Last week’s report by the High Pay Centre showed Jeff Fairburn was paid £47.1m last year – more than 10 times the £3.9m median figure for a FTSE 100 boss. The average employee at Persimmon would have to work 1,130 years to earn Fairburn’s annual pay.

Continue reading...

<p>Yes, it’s the middle of a field – or Ballyclare in Northern Ireland</p><p>No, we have not metamorphosed into the Daily Mail. Indeed, we live in an age of historically low crime; the last <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/crimeinenglandandwalesyearendingjune2017" title="">Crime Survey</a> for England and Wales suggests it fell by 9% in the year to June 2017, and has been falling since 1995. In Scotland, the latest police records put reported crime at its lowest level since 1974.</p><p>In England and Wales, though, the <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingdecember2017/previous/v1" title="">latest records</a> point to a quite steep rise in <em>some</em> crimes: a 22% rise in knife crimes, 11% in firearms, 17% in vehicle theft and 9% in burglaries. These congregate in London (where Kingston-on-Thames has the lowest crime rate, according to the Met’s “<a href="https://www.met.police.uk/sd/stats-and-data/met/crime-data-dashboard/" title="">Crime Data Dashboard</a>”) and the big conurbations. The Dyfed-Powys police area has the UK’s lowest <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/policeforceareadatatables" title="">number of reported crimes</a> (25,114 a year), followed by Cumbria and North Yorkshire.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/aug/18/where-to-move-low-crime-rates">Continue reading...</a>

Where to move for… low crime rates

Aug 18, 2018 8:00

Yes, it’s the middle of a field – or Ballyclare in Northern Ireland

No, we have not metamorphosed into the Daily Mail. Indeed, we live in an age of historically low crime; the last Crime Survey for England and Wales suggests it fell by 9% in the year to June 2017, and has been falling since 1995. In Scotland, the latest police records put reported crime at its lowest level since 1974.

In England and Wales, though, the latest records point to a quite steep rise in some crimes: a 22% rise in knife crimes, 11% in firearms, 17% in vehicle theft and 9% in burglaries. These congregate in London (where Kingston-on-Thames has the lowest crime rate, according to the Met’s “Crime Data Dashboard”) and the big conurbations. The Dyfed-Powys police area has the UK’s lowest number of reported crimes (25,114 a year), followed by Cumbria and North Yorkshire.

Continue reading...

<p>This week’s currency crisis has prompted a flood of overseas buyers seeking bargains</p><p>Property investors have been flocking to Turkey this week in a bid to grab houses and apartments that have in some cases dropped from £55,000 a month ago to below £37,000 now.</p><p>The highly-publicised collapse in the Turkish lira may have been a disaster for the country – and any British expat who bought there in the last two years – but it has been described as a bonanza for those holding US dollars, pounds or euros.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/aug/18/turkey-lira-buy-property">Continue reading...</a>

Property buyers dive in as Turkey’s lira plunges

Aug 18, 2018 7:00

This week’s currency crisis has prompted a flood of overseas buyers seeking bargains

Property investors have been flocking to Turkey this week in a bid to grab houses and apartments that have in some cases dropped from £55,000 a month ago to below £37,000 now.

The highly-publicised collapse in the Turkish lira may have been a disaster for the country – and any British expat who bought there in the last two years – but it has been described as a bonanza for those holding US dollars, pounds or euros.

Continue reading...

<p>Great schools, decent parks, a tight community and, on paper, good prospects</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> With London’s property market closed to anyone earning less than a&nbsp;squillion a day, the early thirtysomethings are leaving the capital. They’ve scarpered to Manchester, Birmingham, Glasgow and Newcastle. So while London’s property prices&nbsp;have flatlined, those in other big cities are rising, and they’re rising fastest in the once-cheapest spots: Birmingham’s Ladywell, Edinburgh’s Holyrood, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/feb/09/a-day-in-finnieston-glasgow-city-guide" title="">Glasgow’s Finnieston</a> and Openshaw, where prices have soared by 13%. Average&nbsp;home&nbsp;prices here are&nbsp;£126,553 still less than half that of Manchester as a&nbsp;whole.&nbsp;This&nbsp;is&nbsp;a neighbourhood that’s had – and has – substantial challenges. But, like Ladywell, Holyrood and Finnieston, it has a great location pretty close to the city centre (and to the M60 for escape) and a long period of fairly sustained investment. Up&nbsp;the road is&nbsp;the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/bike-blog/2012/aug/23/track-cycling-manchester-velodrome" title="">National Cycling Centre</a> and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/football/2011/jul/08/manchester-city-deal-etihad-airways" title="">Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium</a>. There’s a&nbsp;new&nbsp;civic&nbsp;hub and a Metrolink tramline. Openshaw’s got great schools, decent parks, a tight community and, on paper, good prospects. But I won’t lie: you’re not in Kansas/Ancoats any more, Toto.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Openshaw is one of the most deprived spots&nbsp;in the country. It will need more sustained investment to see it&nbsp;prosper.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/aug/17/lets-move-to-openshaw-manchester-great-location">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Openshaw, Manchester: a great location

Aug 17, 2018 16:29

Great schools, decent parks, a tight community and, on paper, good prospects

What’s going for it? With London’s property market closed to anyone earning less than a squillion a day, the early thirtysomethings are leaving the capital. They’ve scarpered to Manchester, Birmingham, Glasgow and Newcastle. So while London’s property prices have flatlined, those in other big cities are rising, and they’re rising fastest in the once-cheapest spots: Birmingham’s Ladywell, Edinburgh’s Holyrood, Glasgow’s Finnieston and Openshaw, where prices have soared by 13%. Average home prices here are £126,553 still less than half that of Manchester as a whole. This is a neighbourhood that’s had – and has – substantial challenges. But, like Ladywell, Holyrood and Finnieston, it has a great location pretty close to the city centre (and to the M60 for escape) and a long period of fairly sustained investment. Up the road is the National Cycling Centre and Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium. There’s a new civic hub and a Metrolink tramline. Openshaw’s got great schools, decent parks, a tight community and, on paper, good prospects. But I won’t lie: you’re not in Kansas/Ancoats any more, Toto.

The case against Openshaw is one of the most deprived spots in the country. It will need more sustained investment to see it prosper.

Continue reading...

<p>Knapped flint. Weatherboards. Georgian townhouse blazing in the sunshine. I love Bury. Can you tell?</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>The streets of Bury are a catwalk for the architecturally curious (ie me). Suffolk-pink painted 16th-century cottages? Yes, please. Don’t like pink? Walk 10 metres and another stunner arrives. Knapped flint. Half timbers. Weatherboards. Georgian townhouse, orange brick walls blazing in the sunshine. Ooh, is that a spot of pargetting? It IS. Yum. Hey, nice tiles. A BOW WINDOW! Lemon-yellow paint? I like it. If <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/nov/15/dan-cruickshank-historian-spitalfields-interiors">Dan Cruickshank</a> had been left in charge of town planning, he couldn’t have come up with better. They should set every BBC period drama here. I haven’t even mentioned the ancient abbey ruins (with hobbity houses built into them!), or the cathedral’s tower, or the hammerbeam roofs and don’t even get me going on the country’s only surviving Regency playhouse. This makes Bury sound like a museum. It isn’t.<a href="https://www.theapex.co.uk/"> The Apex</a>, <a href="https://www.abbeygatecinema.co.uk/">the Abbeygate cinema</a>, the burgeoning food scene: this town has life. I love Bury. Can you tell?</p><p><strong>The case against</strong><strong> </strong>It’s relatively all alone on the A14 (but surrounded by underrated and beautiful countryside).</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/aug/03/lets-move-to-bury-st-edmunds-suffolk-stunning-town">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk: a charming culinary hotspot

Aug 3, 2018 16:30

Knapped flint. Weatherboards. Georgian townhouse blazing in the sunshine. I love Bury. Can you tell?

What’s going for it? The streets of Bury are a catwalk for the architecturally curious (ie me). Suffolk-pink painted 16th-century cottages? Yes, please. Don’t like pink? Walk 10 metres and another stunner arrives. Knapped flint. Half timbers. Weatherboards. Georgian townhouse, orange brick walls blazing in the sunshine. Ooh, is that a spot of pargetting? It IS. Yum. Hey, nice tiles. A BOW WINDOW! Lemon-yellow paint? I like it. If Dan Cruickshank had been left in charge of town planning, he couldn’t have come up with better. They should set every BBC period drama here. I haven’t even mentioned the ancient abbey ruins (with hobbity houses built into them!), or the cathedral’s tower, or the hammerbeam roofs and don’t even get me going on the country’s only surviving Regency playhouse. This makes Bury sound like a museum. It isn’t. The Apex, the Abbeygate cinema, the burgeoning food scene: this town has life. I love Bury. Can you tell?

The case against It’s relatively all alone on the A14 (but surrounded by underrated and beautiful countryside).

Continue reading...

<p>Banksy’s snarky Dismaland gave the fading seaside town a boost – now all it needs is a big idea</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Plans are afoot to magic Weston-super-Mare into Bristol’s Margate. In May, the chief executive of the Arts Council popped by to give the town the princely sum of £50,000, no less, to “build on” the so-called Banksy Effect. I’m no art critic, but I could have sworn there was some irony involved when Mr Banksy brought his <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/aug/20/banksy-dismaland-amusements-anarchism-weston-super-mare">Dismaland</a> theme park to Weston in 2015. Little did he know he was actually the local council regeneration strategy: 150,000 people visited; £20m poured into local coffers, apparently. Brad Pitt dropped in. The Arts Council called the town an “artistic and cultural dream”, which might be over-egging it a tad. But if by that it means affordable rent and property, delicious geography (three sweeping bays, dreamy views across Bristol Channel, and I do love an iron age hill fort) and a nice line in late Victorian architecture, then maybe they’re on to something. Come on, artists. Do your duty. Regenerate!</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> I sense it may take a little more than £50,000 to turn the town’s fortunes around. It’s had a fair bit of investment – the rebuilt pier, smart new paving, festivals-a-go-go, often grim new architecture etc – but many grand plans have come and gone. The town is in great need of a big idea. Oh, the mud at low tide!</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jul/27/lets-move-to-weston-super-mare">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Weston-super-Mare: it's building on the Banksy Effect

July 27, 2018 16:30

Banksy’s snarky Dismaland gave the fading seaside town a boost – now all it needs is a big idea

What’s going for it? Plans are afoot to magic Weston-super-Mare into Bristol’s Margate. In May, the chief executive of the Arts Council popped by to give the town the princely sum of £50,000, no less, to “build on” the so-called Banksy Effect. I’m no art critic, but I could have sworn there was some irony involved when Mr Banksy brought his Dismaland theme park to Weston in 2015. Little did he know he was actually the local council regeneration strategy: 150,000 people visited; £20m poured into local coffers, apparently. Brad Pitt dropped in. The Arts Council called the town an “artistic and cultural dream”, which might be over-egging it a tad. But if by that it means affordable rent and property, delicious geography (three sweeping bays, dreamy views across Bristol Channel, and I do love an iron age hill fort) and a nice line in late Victorian architecture, then maybe they’re on to something. Come on, artists. Do your duty. Regenerate!

The case against I sense it may take a little more than £50,000 to turn the town’s fortunes around. It’s had a fair bit of investment – the rebuilt pier, smart new paving, festivals-a-go-go, often grim new architecture etc – but many grand plans have come and gone. The town is in great need of a big idea. Oh, the mud at low tide!

Continue reading...

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