DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Radical reforms aim to stop insurance, mortgage, phone and broadband firms overcharging</p><p>The competition watchdog has laid down a set of radical reforms to how the insurance, mortgage, mobile phone and broadband markets operate after finding that loyal customers are being overcharged by £4bn.</p><p>Following <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/sep/28/loyal-utility-customers-ripped-off-year-charity-says">a “super complaint” by Citizens Advice</a>, the Competition and Markets Authority investigated concerns that firms penalise existing customers by charging them higher prices than new customers.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/dec/19/watchdog-plans-price-caps-to-stop-4bn-loyal-customer-rip-off">Continue reading...</a>

Watchdog plans price caps to stop £4bn loyal customer rip-off

Dec 19, 2018 8:49

Radical reforms aim to stop insurance, mortgage, phone and broadband firms overcharging

The competition watchdog has laid down a set of radical reforms to how the insurance, mortgage, mobile phone and broadband markets operate after finding that loyal customers are being overcharged by £4bn.

Following a “super complaint” by Citizens Advice, the Competition and Markets Authority investigated concerns that firms penalise existing customers by charging them higher prices than new customers.

Continue reading...

<p>Surveyors body expects Brexit and affordability constraints to take toll on property market</p><p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/dec/17/housing-market-average-uk-asking-price-dips-10000">House prices</a> will stagnate in 2019 and the number of sales fall as a mixture of Brexit and affordability constraints takes its toll on the property market, according to Britain’s surveyors and valuers.</p><p>The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (Rics) said it expected the number of house sales to fall back by 5% to around 1.15m compared with 2018. The number of sales will remain sharply below the 1.7m that changed hands in the peak year of 2006.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/dec/18/house-prices-will-stagnate-in-2019-as-sales-fall-rics-says">Continue reading...</a>

House prices will stagnate in 2019 as sales fall, Rics says

Dec 18, 2018 0:01

Surveyors body expects Brexit and affordability constraints to take toll on property market

House prices will stagnate in 2019 and the number of sales fall as a mixture of Brexit and affordability constraints takes its toll on the property market, according to Britain’s surveyors and valuers.

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (Rics) said it expected the number of house sales to fall back by 5% to around 1.15m compared with 2018. The number of sales will remain sharply below the 1.7m that changed hands in the peak year of 2006.

Continue reading...

<p>I’m worried I’ll lose my bonuses in a help-to-buy Isa and/or relief from stamp duty land tax </p><p><strong>Q</strong> My partner and I are looking to buy our first home in London together so have both been saving in help-to-buy Isa accounts. However, I am soon inheriting a share of a property in Finland. I understand that this apparently ruins my chances of benefiting from any first-time buyer advantages here in UK as I am not allowed to own or have owned any other property beforehand, even overseas.</p><p>After a lot of research, I still haven’t quite managed to find a confirming answer if it makes any difference what the value or owned percentage of the property to be inherited is. In some cases I have understood that the higher stamp duty charges can be negotiated, but I haven’t quite found any guarantees about this either. In my case I will be inheriting 50% of a property where my share is worth less than £25,000 – I suppose no matter how low in value or how small percentage I’d own, it wouldn’t make a difference? I am mainly asking, as of course for the papers we can put down just 49% as my share, should this make a difference as it has a massive difference in the cost of buying my first home here in UK.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/dec/17/do-i-count-as-a-first-time-buyer-if-i-inherit-a-share-of-a-home-abroad">Continue reading...</a>

Do I count as a first-time buyer if I inherit a share of a home abroad?

Dec 17, 2018 7:00

I’m worried I’ll lose my bonuses in a help-to-buy Isa and/or relief from stamp duty land tax

Q My partner and I are looking to buy our first home in London together so have both been saving in help-to-buy Isa accounts. However, I am soon inheriting a share of a property in Finland. I understand that this apparently ruins my chances of benefiting from any first-time buyer advantages here in UK as I am not allowed to own or have owned any other property beforehand, even overseas.

After a lot of research, I still haven’t quite managed to find a confirming answer if it makes any difference what the value or owned percentage of the property to be inherited is. In some cases I have understood that the higher stamp duty charges can be negotiated, but I haven’t quite found any guarantees about this either. In my case I will be inheriting 50% of a property where my share is worth less than £25,000 – I suppose no matter how low in value or how small percentage I’d own, it wouldn’t make a difference? I am mainly asking, as of course for the papers we can put down just 49% as my share, should this make a difference as it has a massive difference in the cost of buying my first home here in UK.

Continue reading...

<p>Larger than usual festive slowdown alarms market with London, east and south-east England worst hit </p><p>Asking prices for homes coming on to the market in the UK are nearly £10,000 lower than they were in October, as the property market headed for its worst annual performance in almost a decade.</p><p>The average asking price of a UK home dipped by 3.2%, or £9,719, between October and December to £297,527, according to the property website <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/rightmove">Rightmove</a>, with prices dipping 1.7% and 1.5% in November and December respectively.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/dec/17/housing-market-average-uk-asking-price-dips-10000">Continue reading...</a>

Housing market: average UK asking price dips £10,000

Dec 17, 2018 6:01

Larger than usual festive slowdown alarms market with London, east and south-east England worst hit

Asking prices for homes coming on to the market in the UK are nearly £10,000 lower than they were in October, as the property market headed for its worst annual performance in almost a decade.

The average asking price of a UK home dipped by 3.2%, or £9,719, between October and December to £297,527, according to the property website Rightmove, with prices dipping 1.7% and 1.5% in November and December respectively.

Continue reading...

<p>Several eras have left an imprint on this south-coast seaside resort, right up to today’s star architects</p><p><strong>What’s going for it</strong><strong>?</strong> What will future historians make of Littlehampton? It’s a curious place, stitched together from various patches that align but somehow don’t connect. At its centre, an old Sussex port on the River Arun, church, quayside, winding lanes and still intact. To the south, facing the sea, a 19th-century resort from the era when salt water and bracing breezes were the cure for all ills. To the west, the dunes and silence of Atherington beach. East? 1920s and 1930s private estates of luxury villas, high walls and climbing roses, as if the upper crust cast of various Agatha Christie whodunnits had settled en masse. Laid over the top, a layer of 1930s to 1960s municipal seasideness – seawalls, proms, concrete, the marvellous bleached-white shelters of Mewsbrook Park, the miniature railway terminus. Here and there, arrivals from the era of regeneration and seaside gentrification (Littlehampton has never quite become the new Margate), designed by assorted young and star architects. It makes for bizarre juxtapositions, surreal even. Littlehampton is a curious place. But all the better for it.</p><p><strong>The case against…</strong> That English south-coast bleakness, the sea often “indistinguishable from the sky”, as Virginia Woolf once put it. Still old-fashioned, in good and bad senses.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/dec/14/lets-move-to-littlehampton-west-sussex-a-surreal-mishmash">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Littlehampton, West Sussex: ‘A surreal mishmash’

Dec 14, 2018 16:30

Several eras have left an imprint on this south-coast seaside resort, right up to today’s star architects

What’s going for it? What will future historians make of Littlehampton? It’s a curious place, stitched together from various patches that align but somehow don’t connect. At its centre, an old Sussex port on the River Arun, church, quayside, winding lanes and still intact. To the south, facing the sea, a 19th-century resort from the era when salt water and bracing breezes were the cure for all ills. To the west, the dunes and silence of Atherington beach. East? 1920s and 1930s private estates of luxury villas, high walls and climbing roses, as if the upper crust cast of various Agatha Christie whodunnits had settled en masse. Laid over the top, a layer of 1930s to 1960s municipal seasideness – seawalls, proms, concrete, the marvellous bleached-white shelters of Mewsbrook Park, the miniature railway terminus. Here and there, arrivals from the era of regeneration and seaside gentrification (Littlehampton has never quite become the new Margate), designed by assorted young and star architects. It makes for bizarre juxtapositions, surreal even. Littlehampton is a curious place. But all the better for it.

The case against… That English south-coast bleakness, the sea often “indistinguishable from the sky”, as Virginia Woolf once put it. Still old-fashioned, in good and bad senses.

Continue reading...

<p>Spend a silent night at these former places of worship, from Somerset to Scotland</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2018/dec/14/homes-for-sale-in-former-churches-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Homes for sale in former churches – in pictures

Dec 14, 2018 7:00

Spend a silent night at these former places of worship, from Somerset to Scotland

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<p>If you want a marina of yachts or kiss-me-quick seaside, this is the place for you</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> Bangor is quite the surprise. I’m not sure what I was expecting but I think it involved grey pebbledash. The town is full of cheer. Victorian townhouses painted the colour of sweeties. Freshly paved streets with perky new trees, as if civic dignitaries were expecting the Queen on Tuesday. Being a seaside town in the British Isles, it has that inevitable double edge of joy and sorrow, but here joy gets the upper hand. Partly that’s down to wealth. This area has long been nicknamed the Gold Coast, pulling in Belfast’s rich for more than a century. While we’re not quite talking Malibu rich, the town has its share of hefty piles and la-di-da. You’ll have to travel a few minutes out of town for decent beaches. Bangor’s petite bay cuddles a marina of yachts straight out of <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0134250/" title="">Howard</a><a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0134250/" title="">s’ Way</a> (extremely woke contemporary cultural reference there). Much of the town, though, is more your bucket-and-spade-kiss-me-quick seaside, and all the better for it. <a href="https://pickiefunpark.com/pickie-puffer/" title="">Pickie Puffer</a>, the miniature steam train that chuffs through <a href="https://pickiefunpark.com/" title="">Pickie</a><a href="https://pickiefunpark.com/" title=""> Fun Park</a>, is a particular high spot. Who says I don’t know how to have fun?</p><p><strong>The case against </strong>Quite pricey, by local standards.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/dec/07/lets-move-to-bangor-county-down">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Bangor, County Down: cheery charm and Belfast’s smart set

Dec 7, 2018 16:30

If you want a marina of yachts or kiss-me-quick seaside, this is the place for you

What’s going for it? Bangor is quite the surprise. I’m not sure what I was expecting but I think it involved grey pebbledash. The town is full of cheer. Victorian townhouses painted the colour of sweeties. Freshly paved streets with perky new trees, as if civic dignitaries were expecting the Queen on Tuesday. Being a seaside town in the British Isles, it has that inevitable double edge of joy and sorrow, but here joy gets the upper hand. Partly that’s down to wealth. This area has long been nicknamed the Gold Coast, pulling in Belfast’s rich for more than a century. While we’re not quite talking Malibu rich, the town has its share of hefty piles and la-di-da. You’ll have to travel a few minutes out of town for decent beaches. Bangor’s petite bay cuddles a marina of yachts straight out of Howards’ Way (extremely woke contemporary cultural reference there). Much of the town, though, is more your bucket-and-spade-kiss-me-quick seaside, and all the better for it. Pickie Puffer, the miniature steam train that chuffs through Pickie Fun Park, is a particular high spot. Who says I don’t know how to have fun?

The case against Quite pricey, by local standards.

Continue reading...

<p>It’s beautiful, occasionally suffocating, but a little bit woke</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>There’s so much past in Chester. It piles up on the streets. It accumulates. Roman amphitheatre, medieval cathedral, Ruskinian town hall, all those Tudor black-and-white, half-timbered buildings straight off a Quality Street tin, all those Victorian black-and-white, half-timbered buildings pretending to be Tudor black-and-white, half-timbered buildings straight off a Quality Street tin, cobbles, ye olde gatehouses, etc. Beautiful. Occasionally suffocating. (I speak as one raised on cathedral cities.) That’s not to say Chester isn’t with it. It’s long had a reputation for middlebrow poshness, all wine bars and pearls. Who knows what they’ve put in the water recently, though, as there’s a tiny bit of mojo in the place. Decent coffee has turned up. The lovely new <a href="https://www.storyhouse.com/about/the-building" title="">Story</a><a href="https://www.storyhouse.com/about/the-building" title="">house arts complex</a> has brought contemporary architecture and cutting-edge culture. It’s even a little bit woke: last year Chester was crowned the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/sep/20/chester-europes-most-accessible-city" title="">most accessible city in Europe for disabled people</a>. In Europe! With those cobbles! Onwards and upwards, Chester.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> It’s pricey, from the property to the cost of living.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/nov/30/lets-move-to-chester-cheshire-history">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Chester: is that a tiny bit of mojo hiding among the history?

Nov 30, 2018 16:30

It’s beautiful, occasionally suffocating, but a little bit woke

What’s going for it? There’s so much past in Chester. It piles up on the streets. It accumulates. Roman amphitheatre, medieval cathedral, Ruskinian town hall, all those Tudor black-and-white, half-timbered buildings straight off a Quality Street tin, all those Victorian black-and-white, half-timbered buildings pretending to be Tudor black-and-white, half-timbered buildings straight off a Quality Street tin, cobbles, ye olde gatehouses, etc. Beautiful. Occasionally suffocating. (I speak as one raised on cathedral cities.) That’s not to say Chester isn’t with it. It’s long had a reputation for middlebrow poshness, all wine bars and pearls. Who knows what they’ve put in the water recently, though, as there’s a tiny bit of mojo in the place. Decent coffee has turned up. The lovely new Storyhouse arts complex has brought contemporary architecture and cutting-edge culture. It’s even a little bit woke: last year Chester was crowned the most accessible city in Europe for disabled people. In Europe! With those cobbles! Onwards and upwards, Chester.

The case against It’s pricey, from the property to the cost of living.

Continue reading...

<p>It’s shabbier than its illustrious neighbours, but that’s what makes it what it is</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>“Here from my eyrie, as the sun went down/I heard the old North London puff and shunt/Glad that I did not live in Gospel Oak.” What an incorrigible snob <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/johnbetjeman" title="">John Betjeman</a> could be. He was <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/jun/07/interiors-john-betjamin-house-renovation" title="">born in Gospel Oak</a>, but couldn’t wait to escape Lissenden Gardens and, as he saw it, haul himself up the social scale when his family moved home up Highgate Hill. Back then Gospel Oak was a shabbier affair, carved up by railway viaducts. Today, London being what it’s become, it’s a lot smarter, though the viaducts are still there, and after Betjeman left they were joined by council estates he’d have doubtless hated. I love the place. When I first moved to London, this is where I dreamed I’d end up, living the north London life. I’d be a professor. I’d be a connoisseur of council estates. I’d probably have a regular column in the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/london-review-of-books" title="">London Review of Books</a> and buy organic veg. I’d be a doughty member of community groups. I’d walk my dog on Parliament Hill and swim daily in the lido. Of course, London being what it’s become, and despite still being cheaper than Highgate, I couldn’t even <em>think</em> of affording to live in Gospel Oak. Funny how life turns out.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> It’s still a shabbier affair than its illustrious neighbours, though I think that’s what makes it what it is.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/nov/23/lets-move-to-gospel-oak-north-london-john-betjeman-tom-dyckhoff">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Gospel Oak, north London: Betjeman hated it, but there’s lots to love

Nov 23, 2018 16:30

It’s shabbier than its illustrious neighbours, but that’s what makes it what it is

What’s going for it? “Here from my eyrie, as the sun went down/I heard the old North London puff and shunt/Glad that I did not live in Gospel Oak.” What an incorrigible snob John Betjeman could be. He was born in Gospel Oak, but couldn’t wait to escape Lissenden Gardens and, as he saw it, haul himself up the social scale when his family moved home up Highgate Hill. Back then Gospel Oak was a shabbier affair, carved up by railway viaducts. Today, London being what it’s become, it’s a lot smarter, though the viaducts are still there, and after Betjeman left they were joined by council estates he’d have doubtless hated. I love the place. When I first moved to London, this is where I dreamed I’d end up, living the north London life. I’d be a professor. I’d be a connoisseur of council estates. I’d probably have a regular column in the London Review of Books and buy organic veg. I’d be a doughty member of community groups. I’d walk my dog on Parliament Hill and swim daily in the lido. Of course, London being what it’s become, and despite still being cheaper than Highgate, I couldn’t even think of affording to live in Gospel Oak. Funny how life turns out.

The case against It’s still a shabbier affair than its illustrious neighbours, though I think that’s what makes it what it is.

Continue reading...

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