DaftDrop UK is a UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Houses in prime areas of capital fetching up to £18,000-a-week rent as demand rises </p><p>Six- and seven-bedroom houses in Notting Hill and Primrose Hill were among a record number of properties rented out at £5,000-plus a week in London last year.</p><p>Upmarket estate agent Knight Frank reported the number of its “super-prime” lettings rose 34% last year to 137, from 102 in 2016. The vast majority of properties are let furnished. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/19/london-posh-home-lettings-hit-record-high">Continue reading...</a>

London posh-home lettings hit record high

Feb 19, 2018 15:52

Houses in prime areas of capital fetching up to £18,000-a-week rent as demand rises

Six- and seven-bedroom houses in Notting Hill and Primrose Hill were among a record number of properties rented out at £5,000-plus a week in London last year.

Upmarket estate agent Knight Frank reported the number of its “super-prime” lettings rose 34% last year to 137, from 102 in 2016. The vast majority of properties are let furnished.

Continue reading...

Concern for vulnerable grows as those on lifeline benefit face ‘second mortgage’<p>Last May, James Martin* decided to give up work and look after his mother full time after she was diagnosed with cancer. A few months later, his father suffered a stroke, leaving the 49-year-old as the main carer for both parents. With income support and carer’s allowance, he receives £108 a week, meaning that the chances of paying his mortgage every month is remote. There is some relief, in that he receives the Support for Mortgage Interest (SMI) benefit, a payment which has been in place for the last 70 years to help financially constrained homeowners with their repayments.</p><p>From April, however, it will stop and be replaced by a new “second mortgage” scheme where the government offers to loan people the money, which will then be repaid later.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/19/support-for-mortgage-interest-change-state-loan">Continue reading...</a>

Concern for vulnerable grows as those on lifeline benefit face ‘second mortgage’

Feb 19, 2018 7:00

Concern for vulnerable grows as those on lifeline benefit face ‘second mortgage’

Last May, James Martin* decided to give up work and look after his mother full time after she was diagnosed with cancer. A few months later, his father suffered a stroke, leaving the 49-year-old as the main carer for both parents. With income support and carer’s allowance, he receives £108 a week, meaning that the chances of paying his mortgage every month is remote. There is some relief, in that he receives the Support for Mortgage Interest (SMI) benefit, a payment which has been in place for the last 70 years to help financially constrained homeowners with their repayments.

From April, however, it will stop and be replaced by a new “second mortgage” scheme where the government offers to loan people the money, which will then be repaid later.

Continue reading...

<p>Rightmove reports busiest ever month and optimistic pricing but property is taking longer to sell </p><p>The average price of a UK property coming on to the market has risen by more than £2,400 in a month to just over £300,000 amid evidence of “record” levels of house-hunting activity, according to Rightmove.</p><p>The website, which tracks 90% of the UK property market, said the national average asking price for a home had increased by 0.8% during the past month, following the 0.7% rise <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/jan/15/average-uk-property-asking-price-up-2000-says-rightmove">it reported in mid-January</a>.<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/feb/19/average-price-newly-marketed-uk-home-300000-rightmove-busiest">Continue reading...</a>

Average price of newly marketed home rises above £300,000 again

Feb 19, 2018 0:01

Rightmove reports busiest ever month and optimistic pricing but property is taking longer to sell

The average price of a UK property coming on to the market has risen by more than £2,400 in a month to just over £300,000 amid evidence of “record” levels of house-hunting activity, according to Rightmove.

The website, which tracks 90% of the UK property market, said the national average asking price for a home had increased by 0.8% during the past month, following the 0.7% rise it reported in mid-January.

Continue reading...

As a new study shows that the housing ladder is now out of reach for many, it’s time for a rethink on renting<p>The news that home ownership among younger people<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/16/homeownership-among-young-adults-collapsed-institute-fiscal-studies" title=""> is “collapsing” </a>will count as one of the least surprising stories of the week. Most people under 40, or those who know someone of that age, understands that the fabled housing ladder is now something held far aloft, as if by spiteful angels, its first rung attainable only by a miraculous leap. Or with the help of parents’ spare cash left over from their own good fortune in the property markets of the past.</p><p>Still, it’s good that the Institute for Fiscal Studies has spelt it out and given detail in its latest report. If you were born just after the dissolution of Wham! in 1986, you would have had a 25% chance of owning a home by the age of 27, compared with 33% if you had been born at the time of the band’s creation in 1981. If you had been born around the time that, in Philip Larkin’s view, sexual intercourse began – 1963 – you would have had a 75% probability of owning a home, a level that the younger generation is unlikely ever to achieve.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/feb/17/plentiful-decent-places-to-live-should-be-priority-not-home-ownership">Continue reading...</a>

Plentiful, decent places to live should be the priority, not home ownership | Rowan Moore

Feb 17, 2018 18:02

As a new study shows that the housing ladder is now out of reach for many, it’s time for a rethink on renting

The news that home ownership among younger people is “collapsing” will count as one of the least surprising stories of the week. Most people under 40, or those who know someone of that age, understands that the fabled housing ladder is now something held far aloft, as if by spiteful angels, its first rung attainable only by a miraculous leap. Or with the help of parents’ spare cash left over from their own good fortune in the property markets of the past.

Still, it’s good that the Institute for Fiscal Studies has spelt it out and given detail in its latest report. If you were born just after the dissolution of Wham! in 1986, you would have had a 25% chance of owning a home by the age of 27, compared with 33% if you had been born at the time of the band’s creation in 1981. If you had been born around the time that, in Philip Larkin’s view, sexual intercourse began – 1963 – you would have had a 75% probability of owning a home, a level that the younger generation is unlikely ever to achieve.

Continue reading...

A third of people think lenders are biased against them, but there are ways to win them over<p>The number of people who are self-employed has increased dramatically since 20001, jumping from 3.3 million to 4.8 million. Do their precarious earnings mean they can’t get mortgages? Will they be treated as second-class citizens by the lenders? Sadly that will be the case for many, especially those in the low-paid “gig economy”. But don’t give up all hope: those who have more dependable earnings, and, crucially, good records of their income, can still land a decent deal.</p><p>Firstly, let’s demolish the myth that there is a category of loans called the “self-employed” mortgage. People who work for themselves are able to get the same rates as everyone else; the problem is, they have more complex incomes and must be able to prove their earnings.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/17/self-employed-mortgages-home-loans">Continue reading...</a>

Self-employed? Here’s how to get a mortgage

Feb 17, 2018 13:43

A third of people think lenders are biased against them, but there are ways to win them over

The number of people who are self-employed has increased dramatically since 20001, jumping from 3.3 million to 4.8 million. Do their precarious earnings mean they can’t get mortgages? Will they be treated as second-class citizens by the lenders? Sadly that will be the case for many, especially those in the low-paid “gig economy”. But don’t give up all hope: those who have more dependable earnings, and, crucially, good records of their income, can still land a decent deal.

Firstly, let’s demolish the myth that there is a category of loans called the “self-employed” mortgage. People who work for themselves are able to get the same rates as everyone else; the problem is, they have more complex incomes and must be able to prove their earnings.

Continue reading...

<p>The best places in Britain for longevity? (Clue: it helps if you have money)</p><p>Easy-peasy: somewhere rich (this week’s column comes via the Research Institute of the Bleeding Obvious). <a href="http://">Office for National Statistics figures</a> released in December showed that for a long life, please emerge into the universe in Camden (for women, 86.8 years) or Kensington &amp; Chelsea (for men, 83.7 years).</p><p>Can’t afford to be born on the most expensive patches of land in the country? Hmm. Have you considered numbers two and three on the lists? East Dorset? The Chilterns? Perhaps Hart, just off the M3? Insufficient funds available? There’s the rub.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/feb/17/where-to-move-for-longevity-long-life-uk-tom-dyckhoff">Continue reading...</a>

Where to move for… a long life

Feb 17, 2018 8:00

The best places in Britain for longevity? (Clue: it helps if you have money)

Easy-peasy: somewhere rich (this week’s column comes via the Research Institute of the Bleeding Obvious). Office for National Statistics figures released in December showed that for a long life, please emerge into the universe in Camden (for women, 86.8 years) or Kensington & Chelsea (for men, 83.7 years).

Can’t afford to be born on the most expensive patches of land in the country? Hmm. Have you considered numbers two and three on the lists? East Dorset? The Chilterns? Perhaps Hart, just off the M3? Insufficient funds available? There’s the rub.

Continue reading...

<p>Imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmers</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> A confession: sometimes I pretend to read the Daily Telegraph. It’s a bit like cosplay. I try to imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmer,&nbsp;with a <a href="https://www.plainenglishdesign.co.uk/">Plain English</a> tongue-and-groove kitchen, polenta cake in the oven, pedigree labrador panting at the back door, several cases of vintage claret in the cellar. Perhaps like <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/profiles/4wGJsYGWMNnDn1NpG8DzjwY/jennifer-aldridge">Jennifer off The Archers</a>. Probably in Chipping Campden. It’s that kind of place: amazing, if you detach yourself from your entire world view. Gorgeous, rose-garnished 17th-century cottages lived in by Jemima Puddleducks, straight outta <a href="https://www.thisengland.co.uk/">This England</a>. Window frames freshly painted. No stained mattresses abandoned on the&nbsp;pavement. Framed photos of the Queen or St Jacob Rees-Mogg. Topiaried hedges. Quaint local customs (its Olimpick Games). Morris dancing (the horror). If there is a&nbsp;seamier side of closet <a href="https://www.redpepper.org.uk/about/">Red Pepper</a> subscribers, then my undercover research must have&nbsp;failed me.</p><p><strong>The case against…</strong> The rest of reality kept at bay. Morris dancing, etc. Tourists (though far fewer than Broadway and Moreton-in-Marsh).</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/16/lets-move-to-chipping-campden-gloucestershire-tom-dyckhoff">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire

Feb 16, 2018 16:30

Imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmers

What’s going for it? A confession: sometimes I pretend to read the Daily Telegraph. It’s a bit like cosplay. I try to imagine living life in tweed slacks and Boden quilted bodywarmer, with a Plain English tongue-and-groove kitchen, polenta cake in the oven, pedigree labrador panting at the back door, several cases of vintage claret in the cellar. Perhaps like Jennifer off The Archers. Probably in Chipping Campden. It’s that kind of place: amazing, if you detach yourself from your entire world view. Gorgeous, rose-garnished 17th-century cottages lived in by Jemima Puddleducks, straight outta This England. Window frames freshly painted. No stained mattresses abandoned on the pavement. Framed photos of the Queen or St Jacob Rees-Mogg. Topiaried hedges. Quaint local customs (its Olimpick Games). Morris dancing (the horror). If there is a seamier side of closet Red Pepper subscribers, then my undercover research must have failed me.

The case against… The rest of reality kept at bay. Morris dancing, etc. Tourists (though far fewer than Broadway and Moreton-in-Marsh).

Continue reading...

<p>It will regenerate again before long</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>Deptford has been regenerated. It’s like what happens occasionally in <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/doctor-who">Doctor Who</a>, only with bollards and negroni bars. Like Doctor Who, regeneration comes accompanied with not a little controversy. And, like Doctor Who, this is very much not the first time. The neighbourhood seems to have been in permanent regeneration mode since Henry VIII stuck his dockyard here. Deptford’s latest shape appears to be Peckhamdalstonhackneyorsomewherelikethat. The old new Deptfords – halal butchers, mighty council estates, continental grocers, the brilliant <a href="http://www.thealbany.org.uk/">Albany theatre</a>, the beautiful 18th-century St Paul’s church, the splendid <a href="https://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/">Laban Centre</a> (ah, the Blair years!), two pie-and-mash shops, stained mattresses and greasy chicken shop wrappers piled on the pavement – they’re all still there, only they’ve been joined by “creative spaces” and craft gin bars. The library is called a “lounge”, dressed in gold lamé, decking and lattes, with a ball court on the roof, so you can throw a few hoops with your Proust. Love it, hate it? Worry not. It’ll regenerate again before long.</p><p><strong>The case against… </strong>Not for the faint-hearted: it’s a vigorous, noisy, traffic-clogged spot, with little green space and relief, bar a soothing walk along the sludgy Deptford Creek. Even more regeneration, in the shape of the vast <a href="http://www.convoys-wharf.com/">Convoys Wharf development</a>, awaits.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/09/lets-move-to-deptford-south-east-london-property-tom-dyckhoff">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Deptford, south-east London: love it, hate it? Worry not

Feb 9, 2018 16:29

It will regenerate again before long

What’s going for it? Deptford has been regenerated. It’s like what happens occasionally in Doctor Who, only with bollards and negroni bars. Like Doctor Who, regeneration comes accompanied with not a little controversy. And, like Doctor Who, this is very much not the first time. The neighbourhood seems to have been in permanent regeneration mode since Henry VIII stuck his dockyard here. Deptford’s latest shape appears to be Peckhamdalstonhackneyorsomewherelikethat. The old new Deptfords – halal butchers, mighty council estates, continental grocers, the brilliant Albany theatre, the beautiful 18th-century St Paul’s church, the splendid Laban Centre (ah, the Blair years!), two pie-and-mash shops, stained mattresses and greasy chicken shop wrappers piled on the pavement – they’re all still there, only they’ve been joined by “creative spaces” and craft gin bars. The library is called a “lounge”, dressed in gold lamé, decking and lattes, with a ball court on the roof, so you can throw a few hoops with your Proust. Love it, hate it? Worry not. It’ll regenerate again before long.

The case against… Not for the faint-hearted: it’s a vigorous, noisy, traffic-clogged spot, with little green space and relief, bar a soothing walk along the sludgy Deptford Creek. Even more regeneration, in the shape of the vast Convoys Wharf development, awaits.

Continue reading...

<p>Yes, the green welly brigade is in evidence, but this market town is one of those rare spots in the countryside where Guardian readers can be out and proud</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> It’s not often one yearns to set eyes upon a concrete multistorey car park. But Stroud is a welcome corrective to most Cotswolds towns, which are a succession of cutie pies, all Country Casuals, antiques shops and unmuddied green wellies, like scoffing three boxes of Thorntons with <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2011/may/14/the-waltons-ian-sansom-dynasties">The Waltons</a> on loop.</p><p>First of all, multistoreys. The town has its pretty moments, but much of it is ordinary (good ordinary), occasionally shabby (good shabby). Second, although the green welly brigade is in evidence, it is outnumbered. There is a Peacocks. There is the great <a href="https://twitter.com/stroudbookshop">Stroud bookshop</a>. There is <a href="http://www.fattoni.co.uk/stroud/">Fat Toni’s pizzeria</a> (slogan: “history in the baking”). It has health-food shops. It has community farms. It has “Britain’s first totally organic cafe”. It has a spirited community that likes nothing more than seeing off Tesco, McDonald’s and the BNP while rooting for trees, hospitals and post offices. That is right: Stroud is one of those rare spots in the countryside – such as <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2009/may/09/lewes-sussex-properties">Lewes</a> or <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2012/sep/28/lets-move-to-totnes-devon">Totnes</a> – where Guardian readers can be out and proud.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/02/lets-move-to-stroud-gloucestershire-cotswolds">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Stroud, Gloucestershire: a spirited community in the Cotswolds

Feb 2, 2018 16:30

Yes, the green welly brigade is in evidence, but this market town is one of those rare spots in the countryside where Guardian readers can be out and proud

What’s going for it? It’s not often one yearns to set eyes upon a concrete multistorey car park. But Stroud is a welcome corrective to most Cotswolds towns, which are a succession of cutie pies, all Country Casuals, antiques shops and unmuddied green wellies, like scoffing three boxes of Thorntons with The Waltons on loop.

First of all, multistoreys. The town has its pretty moments, but much of it is ordinary (good ordinary), occasionally shabby (good shabby). Second, although the green welly brigade is in evidence, it is outnumbered. There is a Peacocks. There is the great Stroud bookshop. There is Fat Toni’s pizzeria (slogan: “history in the baking”). It has health-food shops. It has community farms. It has “Britain’s first totally organic cafe”. It has a spirited community that likes nothing more than seeing off Tesco, McDonald’s and the BNP while rooting for trees, hospitals and post offices. That is right: Stroud is one of those rare spots in the countryside – such as Lewes or Totnes – where Guardian readers can be out and proud.

Continue reading...

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